Polaris Indy VR1 129, 137, Indy XC Owner's Manual PDF

Pages 243
Year 2021
Language(s)
English en
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Summary of Content for Polaris Indy VR1 129, 137, Indy XC Owner's Manual PDF

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Indy XC Launch Edition 129 / 137 Switchback Assault 146

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Apple is a registered trademark of Apple Inc... iOS is a registered trademark of Cisco Technology, Inc... Recreational Off-Highway Vehicle Association is a registered trademark of Recreational Off-Highway Vehicle Association... Loctite is a registered trademark of Henkel AG & Co... NGK is a registered trademark of NGK Spark Plug Co... , Ltd... BatteryMINDer is a registered trademark of VDC Electronics Inc... QR Code is a registered trademark of DENSO WAVE Inc... ORTOVOX is a registered trademark of Ortovox Sportartikel GmbH... SAE is a registered trademark of Society of Automotive Engineeers, Inc... KLIM is a registered trademark of Teton Outfitters, LLC... COLDPLAY is a registered trademark of COLDPLAY... Bluetooth is a registered trademark of Bluetooth Sig, Inc... Android is a registered trademark of Google LLC... Google Play is a registered trademark of Google LLC... Hayes is a registered trademark of Hayes Bicycle Group, Inc... Woody's registered trademark of International Engineering & Manufacturing Inc... SENA is a registered trademark of SENATechnologies, Inc...

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Here at POLARIS we proudly produce an exciting line of utility and recreational products... We believe POLARIS sets a standard of excellence for all utility and recreational vehicles manufactured in the world today... Many years of experience have gone into the engineering, design, and development of your POLARIS vehicle, making it the finest machine weve ever produced...

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The following signal words and symbols appear throughout this manual and on your vehicle... Your safety is involved when these words and symbols are used... Become familiar with their meanings before reading the manual...

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Introduction ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... 7 Safety ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... 11 Features ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... 31 Ride Command Display ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... 67 The Perfect Fit ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... 107 Snowmobile Break-In ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... 123 Pre-Ride Inspections ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... 125 Operation ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... 133 Maintenance ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... 147 Specifications ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... 193 Diagnostic Trouble Codes (DTC)... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... 201 Troubleshooting ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... 215 Warranty ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... 223 Maintenance Log ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... 233

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When teaching inexperienced operators to ride, set up a predetermined course for practice... Make sure they know how to drive and control the snowmobile before allowing them to make longer trips... Teach them proper snowmobile courtesy, and enroll them in drivers training and safety courses sponsored by local or state organizations...

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POLARIS snowmobiles are engineered to conform to these SAE standards... Our muffler systems are designed to reduce noise levels and must not be altered or removed... The sound of your snowmobile may not be welcome to non- snowmobilers, so you have a responsibility to operate your snowmobile with concern for others... We do our part by manufacturing quieter machines; we ask your help to further reduce the impact of noise by operating your snowmobile safely and responsibly...

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KEY IDENTIFICATION The ignition keys are etched with an identification number... Remove the spare key and store it in a safe place... Your key can be duplicated only by mating a POLARIS key blank using the same identification number with one of your existing keys, so if both keys are lost, the ignition switch assembly must be replaced...

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WARNING Serious injuries may result if hands, feet, or clothing become entangled in the track... Be alert when riding, and remain properly seated to stay clear of the track... Never hold the snowmobile up or stand behind it while warming up the track... A loose track or flying debris could cause serious injury or death... We recommend having your dealer perform all track service and alignment

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RIDING POSITION Operating a snowmobile requires skill and balance for proper control... Rider positions may vary with experience and the features available on some snowmobiles, but under many conditions, the proper position is to be seated with both feet on the running boards and both hands on the handlebar grips for proper throttle, brake and steering control...

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EYE PROTECTION Do not depend on eyeglasses or sunglasses for eye protection... Whenever riding a POLARIS vehicle, always wear shatterproof goggles or use a shatterproof helmet face shield... POLARIS recommends wearing approved Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) bearing markings such as VESC 8, V-8, Z87... 1, or CE... Make sure protective eye wear is kept clean...

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SURVIVAL PREPARATION For your safety, always ride in a group of other snowmobilers... Always tell someone where you're going and how long you expect to be gone... If it isn't possible to ride with others, and you must travel into remote areas, always carry survival equipment that's appropriate to the conditions you may encounter... Such equipment may include, but is not limited to: extra clothing, a sleeping bag, a flashlight, food and water, a signaling mirror, a means of building a fire, and a two-way radio or cellular telephone...

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Variances in snow depth and/or water currents may result in uneven ice thickness... You may drown if you break through the ice... Never travel on frozen bodies of water unless you have first verified that the ice is sufficiently thick to support the weight and moving force of the snowmobile, you and your cargo, together with any other vehicles in your party... Always check with local authorities and residents to confirm ice conditions and thickness over your entire route... Snowmobile operators assume all risk associated with ice conditions on frozen bodies of water...

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The avalanche information provided in this manual should be considered basic information and is not intended to replace your participation in an avalanche safety training course... After reviewing the avalanche information in this manual, be sure to participate in an avalanche safety training course before riding in mountainous terrain... The training course will provide more information as well as the opportunity to practice riding and using proper search and recovery techniques...

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GET THE SAFETY GEAR In addition to carrying a spare belt, spark plugs and tools on each snowmobile, each person in your riding group should wear the recommended snowmobile riding apparel and carry (on their person) the following survival items when riding in mountainous terrain:

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GET TO KNOW YOUR SAFETY GEAR Following the safety gear and apparel recommendations will increase your chances of survival if you encounter an avalanche or become stranded in the backcountry, but even experienced and properly-equipped snowmobilers, hikers and skiers perish in avalanches or succumb to hypothermia... Using a beacon or probe for the first time during an avalanche recovery operation, or not knowing how to deploy your avalanche air bag backpack during a slide, should be considered UNACCEPTABLE to you and all members of your riding group... Its critical that you and all members of your riding group know how to use the safety gear...

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GET THE PICTURE Slopes steeper than 30 are more prone to avalanches, but any slope should be considered avalanche terrain, even small slopes with trees... Low-angle slopes are also avalanche terrain if they have steeper slopes above them...

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Always research current avalanche conditions in your area of operation before riding... Check with local law enforcement, resort or lodging personnel, gas station attendants and other riders to learn about current conditions and any advisories in the area...

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North American Public Avalanche Danger Scale Avalanche danger is determined by the likelihood, size and distribution of avalanches...

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WARNING Inadequate cooling and lubrication will lead to overheating of the slide rail and track, causing premature wear, damage and failure, which can result in serious injury... Reduce speeds and frequently drive into fresh snow to allow adequate cooling and polishing of the slide rail and track surfaces... Avoid operating for

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If you're unable to continue up a hill, turn the snowmobile downhill before it loses momentum... If this isn't possible, spin the track just enough to dig in to prevent it from rolling back down the hill... Stop the engine and set the parking brake (if equipped)... Keeping away from the downhill side of the snowmobile, pull the rear of the snowmobile around and point the front end and skis downhill... Remount the snowmobile, restart the engine, release the parking brake, and descend the hill carefully...

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COLD WEATHER DRIVE-AWAY Whenever your snowmobile has been parked for a length of time, especially overnight, always make sure the skis and track are loosened from ice and snow before attempting to drive... Apply the throttle with enough authority to put the snowmobile into motion, but always operate within safety limits...

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When traveling in a group of snowmobiles, don't tailgate (follow too closely)... Leave enough distance between snowmobiles to provide ample stopping room and to provide protection from flying snow and debris... Allow even more distance when driving on slippery surfaces or when driving in darkness or other low visibility conditions... Be aware of any snowmobile traffic around your vehicle... Drive defensively to avoid accidents...

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Calm 5 2 -1 -4 -7 -10 -13 -16 -19 -22 -25 -28 -31 -34 -37 -40 -43 -46 8 3 0 -4 -7 -11 -14 -18 -22 -25 -29 -32 -36 -39 -43 -46 -50 -53 -57 16 2 -2 -6 -10 -13 -17 -21 -24 -28 -32 -36 -39 -43 -47 -50 -54 -58 -62 24 1 -3 -7 -11 -15 -19 -22 -26 -30 -34 -38 -42 -45 -49 -53 -57 -61 -65 32 0 -4 -8 -12 -16 -20 -24 -28 -32 -36 -39 -43 -47 -51 -55 -59 -63 -67 40 -1 -5 -9 -13 -17 -21 -25 -29 -33 -37 -41 -45 -49 -53 -57 -61 -65 -69 48 -1 -5 -9 -13 -18 -22 -26 -30 -34 -38 -42 -46 -50 -54 -58 -62 -66 -70 56 -2 -6 -10 -14 -18 -22 -26 -31 -35 -39 -43 -47 -51 -55 -59 -64 -68 -72 64 -2 -6 -10 -15 -19 -23 -27 -31 -35 -40 -44 -48 -52 -56 -61 -65 -69 -73 72 -2 -7 -11 -15 -19 -23 -28 -32 -36 -40 -45 -49 -53 -57 -61 -66 -70 -74 80 -3 -7 -11 -15 -20 -24 -28 -33 -37 -41 -45 -50 -54 -58 -62 -67 -71 -75 88 -3 -7 -12 -16 -20 -24 -29 -33 -37 -42 -46 -50 -55 -59 -63 -67 -72 -76 96 -3 -8 -12 -16 -21 -25 -29 -34 -38 -42 -47 -51 -55 -60 -64 -68 -73 -77

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SAFETY LABELS AND LOCATIONS Warning labels are placed on the snowmobile for your protection... Read and follow the instructions of the labels and warnings on the snowmobile carefully... If any of the labels depicted in this manual differ from the labels on your snowmobile, always read and follow the instructions of the labels on the snowmobile...

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WARNING To avoid serious injury or death, read and understand all warnings and the Owner's Manual before operation... If manual is missing, contact a POLARIS dealer for a replacement...

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REPORTING SAFETY DEFECTS (CANADA) To report a safety defect to Transport Canada, you may either fill out an online defect complaint form at their website (English: http://www/tc/gc/ca/recalls, French: http://www... tc... gc... ca/rappels) or contact their Defect Investigations and Recalls Division by calling toll-free 1-800-333-0510 (Canada) or 819-994-3328 (Ottawa-Gatineau area / International)...

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i Fuel Cap o Operator Seat a Taillight s Rear Bumper d Snow Flap f Spindle g Front Suspension

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q Brake Lever w Parking Brake Lock e 7S Display (if equipped) r Engine Stop Switch t Throttle Control y Ignition Switch u Recoil Starter Handle i Hand Controls o Heated Grips Button a Polaris Electronic Reverse (PERC) Button s Headlight Dimmer Button

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The 7S Display is not dependent on a battery while the engine is running... This allows the 7S to remain fully powered and retain GPS lock during a successful PERC event (forward/reverse transition)... When the engine is shut off, the

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If equipped, the 12-volt DC power receptacle is located on the hood next to the instrument cluster... The 12-volt power receptacle is protected by a 2 amp mini blade fuse located the fuse block, or in a protective bag above the clutch cover... Use of the 12-volt DC power receptacle is recommended for connecting power-sensitive devices such as GPS units and cell phones...

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INSPECTION It is very crucial to correctly complete the steps below in order to achieve optimal headlight performance... The headlight can be inspected for vertical aim using the following procedure...

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2... If adjustment is necessary, an adjuster knob is located on the back of the headlight, which can be accessed by removing the vehicles left side panel...

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L-WRENCH When properly engaged in the bracket, the L-wrenchq secures the fender to the console... To retrieve the L-wrench, rotate it counter-clockwise and slide it upward from the bracket... Return the L- wrench to the bracket and rotate it clockwise when its not in use...

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This applies to, but is not limited to the following areas: brakes, clutches, fuel systems, and exhaust systems... Exhaust systems are critical safety areas that must use approved POLARIS parts... Please see your POLARIS dealer for service...

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If the ECU determines the detonation cannot be controlled by normal means, and further operation may cause engine damage, the check engine LED will flash, the instrument clusters will display DETONATION and the ECU will either limit the maximum engine speed or turn off the engine...

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NOTICE The instrument cluster alert indicates which cylinder is experiencing detonation

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SECURITY SYSTEM (IGNITION LOCK SYSTEM) Your snowmobile has an optional security function that can be activated by an authorized Polaris dealer... If you have this feature activated, you can lock the ignition to prevent unauthorized use when leaving the snowmobile unattended... A locked system will limit engine speed to 3000 RPM, which prevents clutch engagement, and the snowmobile will not move when throttle is applied...

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The instrument cluster and gauge (if equipped) contains indicator lights and the rider information center... The information center can be controlled by the ARROW buttonss and SELECT buttond on the hand controls...

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The over-temperature indicator will illuminate when the engine is overheating... Take action to cool the engine... The indicator will flash when engine temperature reaches critical levels... Stop the engine immediately...

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RIDER INFORMATION CENTER The rider information center is located in the instrument cluster... The center displays vehicle speed, engine speed, odometer, resettable trip meters (2), total engine hours of operation, fuel level, engine temperature, and a diagnostic display mode...

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INFORMATION DISPLAYAREA This area displays either engine speed or vehicle speed (whichever is not displayed in the speed display), engine temperature, maximum vehicle speed, and speed or RPM... To change the display, press and release the MODE button or the MODE switch until the desired item is displayed...

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The odometer displays the total distance traveled by the vehicle since manufacture... Each trip meter records the distance traveled by the vehicle on a trip if the meter is reset before each trip... The CLOCK displays the time, and the engine hour meter displays the total hours the engine has been in operation since manufacture...

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The playback indicator will flash while recording is in progress... Recording is complete when the light stops flashing...

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STANDARD/METRIC DISPLAY The odometer and temperature displays can be viewed in either standard or metric units of measurement... Both displays change if units are changed... The new settings will remain until changed by the operator...

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SECURITY SYSTEM (IGNITION LOCK SYSTEM) This system is an optional feature and will not function until it has been activated by your authorized POLARIS dealer... If you have this feature activated, you can lock the ignition to prevent unauthorized use when leaving the snowmobile unattended... A locked system will limit engine speed to 3000 RPM, which prevents clutch engagement, and the snowmobile will not move when throttle is applied...

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2... Press and release the MODE button until SECURITY OFF appears in the information display area...

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If code is correct, SECURITY ON will appear in the information display area... The system is now locked... Proceed immediately to Task 3...

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3... Press and hold the SET button to accept the 1st digit and advance to the 2nd digit...

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If code is incorrect, BAD CODE will appear in the information display area... Return to step 1 to re-enter code...

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1... Immediately after locking and unlocking the system, and while SECURE OFF is displayed, simultaneously press and hold the MODE and SET buttons...

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TIP If you lose your personal security code, see your dealer to have the code reset to 000... Then perform TASK 2 through TASK 4 to change the code to one of

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3... Press and release the MODE button until SECURITY OFF appears in the information display area...

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If code is correct, SECURITY ON will appear in the information display area... The system is now locked... Proceed immediately to Task 3...

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UNLOCKING SYSTEMWITH PERSONAL SECURITY CODE 1... While the engine is running, Press and release the SET button...

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CHANGING TO A NEW SECURITY CODE Any time you wish to change your current security code to a new code, perform TASK 2 through TASK 4 of the First Time Use of Your Security System procedure... Instead of using the factory default code 000 in TASK 2 and TASK 3, use your current security code...

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SECURITY SYSTEM ACCESS QUICK REFERENCE Now that you have become familiar with the procedure for locking and unlocking the system, use the chart below as a quick reference...

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Do not stop the engine if you want to view the active code (failure code)... Active codes cannot be retrieved if power is interrupted to the instrument cluster... The codes will become inactive codes if power is interrupted... Inactive codes are stored in the history of the unit... Please see your POLARIS dealer can help retrieve inactive codes...

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HEATED GRIPS The heated handlebar grips can be operated using the left hand controls... To customize the temperature of the grips, follow the procedure below...

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ACTIVATE HEATED GRIPS To activate the smartwarmers in the handlebars, press the Heated Grips buttonq on the left hand controls... There are four heat levels to choose from: Low Medium High Off

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ENGINE OVERHEAT INDICATOR The over-temperature indicator on the standard instrument cluster will illuminate when the engine is overheating... Take action to cool the engine... See ... The indicator will flash when engine temperature reaches critical levels... Stop the engine immediately...

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Drive in loose snow... View the coolant level... Do not open the pressure cap while the engine is hot... Stop the engine and allow it to cool down... Add coolant if the level is low... Do not add coolant while the engine is hot... Wait for the engine to cool before adding coolant...

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WARNING Do not enter information while operating your vehicle... Failure to pay attention to operating your vehicle could result in loss of control, injury, or death... You assume all risks associated with using this device... Read your User Guide... Always ride with the latest maps and trails data from https://ridecommand...

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TOUCHSCREEN DISPLAY COMPLIANCE STATEMENT Notice: This device complies with part 15 of the FCC Rules and with Industry Canada license-exempt RSS standard(s)... Operation is subject to the following two conditions: (1) this device may not cause interference, and (2) this device must accept any interference received including interference that may cause undesired operation...

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Commission (FCC) rules... These requirements are intended to provide reasonable protection against harmful interference in a residential installation... This equipment generates, uses and can radiate radio frequency energy and, if not installed and used in accordance with the instructions, may cause harmful interference to radio communications... However, there is no guarantee that interference will not

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Commission (FCC) rules... These requirements are intended to provide reasonable protection against harmful interference in a residential installation... This equipment generates, uses and can radiate radio frequency energy and, if not installed and used in accordance with the instructions, may cause harmful interference to radio communications... However, there is no guarantee that interference will not

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WARNING Driving while distracted can result in loss of vehicle control, crash, and injury... We strongly recommend that you use extreme caution when using any device that may take your focus off the trail... Your primary responsibility is the safe operation of your vehicle... We recommend against the use of any hand-held device while riding and encourage the use of voice-operated systems when possible... Be aware of all applicable local laws that may affect the use of

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Zooms in and out of map and scrolls through lists of features...

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LEFT HAND CONTROLS The electronic hand controls are located on the left side of the handlebars... The hand controls operate certain Ride Command features, headlights, reverse operation, and heated grips...

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GAUGE SCREEN The Gauge Screen is the screen that will appear upon vehicle start-up and displays a customizable view of vehicle information including speed, RPM, fuel level, engine temperature, engine hours, trip meter, battery voltage, and compass...

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NOTICE In the gauge configuration panel, display buttons and hand controls will not work... You must use the touchscreen to change screen settings and layouts...

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4... Select the Data Tab... Choose up to 5 widgets to display on the screen...

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5... Reorder the widgets by pressing and holding down on the widget and sliding the widget up or down into the desired position...

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ICON BAR The Icon Bar is located across the top of the touchscreen and displays cell phone and headset connectivity, fuel range, compass heading and local time...

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BADGE PANEL The badge panel provides easy access to frequently used features, basic display and vehicle controls, and a list of recent notifications... To access the Badge Panel, press the Polaris logo at the top of the display screen, or press the Polaris Menu/Power hard button...

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APP TRAY The App Tray provides easy access to key features on the display screen... Tap on any of the listed icons to navigate to that display screen... For example, tap the map icon to navigate to the map screen, or press the audio icon to navigate to the audio screen...

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The appearance of this banner indicates continued operation of your snowmobile could result in serious engine damage... The engine management system will automatically reduce engine power and set a fault... Stop the engine immediately... Allow the engine to cool down...

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HEATED GRIPS Matryx models are equipped with three individual Smartwarmer heated grips: the left handgrip, right handgrip, and right thumb throttle lever... The warmers automatically adjust in response ambient temperature and wind chill to always keep the temperature of the grips at the preset temperature...

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In the Heated Grips section of the Badge Panel, press the Heated Grip Settings button on the touchscreen... To customize the temperature of your hand grips and thumb lever, use Plus and Minus Buttons beside each heat level to choose your preferred setting... Click the X in the top left of the screen, or the Back Button, to close the menu...

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LOCK VEHICLE BUTTON If your vehicle is equipped with a pin activated security system (P... A... S... S... ), the Lock Vehicle button will appear on the Badge Panel... Press this button to lock the vehicle before powering off the engine... To unlock your vehicle, you will be prompted to enter a preset passcode... To set up P... A... S... S... , see page 103...

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Audio playback through USB or Bluetooth devices are compatible with your Ride Command display... The Music Screen allows you to access music stored on your smartphone or other music device... You can pair your device using Bluetooth, or by connecting it to the displays USB port...

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NOTICE On some phones you have to make the phone visible to other devices... If your phone has this feature, it should show up on the Bluetooth connection screen of your phone... If no option exists to make your phone visible to the display, it is

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CONNECTING YOUR BLUETOOTH HEADSET WITH THE DISPLAY The Ride Command touchscreen display can be connected to a smartphone and headset simultaneously... The display can connect with Polaris-approved Bluetooth headsets to listen to music, take phone calls, and talk with other riders...

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The waypoint icon appears when navigation is in use and the GPS is routed to a specific waypoint... Press the waypoint icon to focus on the destination point... To set the focus back to your location, press the target icon in the bottom right corner of the screen...

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The compass icon on the right side of the screen toggles how the map orients itself during navigation... There are two orientation options: North Up and Course Up... Pressing this button will also re-center your vehicle if not already centered...

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POINTS OF INTEREST (POI) Points of interest (POI), such as restaurants, gas stations, hotels, dealers, and more, are available from the map screen... POI will display on map screen as you zoom in and out of the map... Tap on the POI icon to view more information about the location...

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For information on how Group Ride works and for instructions on how to set up Group Ride using your smartphone, or with a vehicle-to-vehicle (V2V) antenna, tap the i icon beside the title from the Group Ride Panelq...

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GROUP RIDE SETUP There are two ways to set up a group ride...

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MOBILE PHONE GROUP RIDE Features of using your mobile phone for group riding: Works within cellular range Requires a tethered mobile phone Infinite range between vehicles Works with friends using the mobile app

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VEHICLE TO VEHICLE (V2V) ANTENNA Features of using the Vehicle-to-Vehicle antenna for group riding: Works anywhere, no phone required Requires an installed V2V antenna, standard on MY21 vehicles with a 7S 1+ miles range between vehicles

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Close the pop up to show the map view of your chosen ride group... Other riders appear as dots on the map... If a rider is moving, the dot includes a heading arrow pointing in the direction they are riding... The ride group panel on the side of the screen shows the name of the group and lists all group members with their name, icon color, distance and bearing from you to that rider...

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2... Give the group a name and choose whether a passcode should be required for others to join the group... If the Private toggle is tapped, you will be prompted to enter a four-digit passcode...

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5... After a second rider joins, the map will switch to zoom-to-group and as you ride it will automatically zoom to keep all riders in view... Tap the zoom control to return to manual zoom mode...

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SETTINGS From Settings, you can view important details about your vehicle and personalize your touchscreen display... The settings menu is comprised of four categories: Vehicle Info, General, Time, and Vehicle Settings...

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Vehicle Identification Number (VIN) Installed Software Version Mileage Total Engine Hours Next Service Interval

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Connect to Ride Command account Manage Bluetooth devices Change the display language Set the speed units of measure (MPH or KM/H) Set the temperature units (F or C) System information Update software Update maps and trails

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Set time from internal GPS location Set time zone Set time (if GPS time is not enabled) Set date Enable GPS Time (automatically sets the time to the time zone you are currently in)

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Access vehicle diagnostics GPS Status Set fuel type Customize heated grip temperatures

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NOTICE After activating P... A... S... S... for the first time you must power down the vehicle and allow the ECM fully shutdown before restarting... This may take up to three

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MAINTENANCE CARE AND MAINTENANCE To clean the display shell, use a soft cloth with mild soap and water... Do not use harsh or abrasive cleaners... For best results, use a micro-fiber towel to clean the screen...

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USB HARDWARE SOFTWARE UPDATES For software update, POLARIS recommends using a SanDisk or similar USB flash drive with a minimum of 4GB in available memory, formatted using the FAT32 or exFAT file systems... For best results remove all files from the flash drive before starting the update process...

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On models equipped with a Polaris Ride Command display, the USB port is also used to update the display software... For the latest software, go to https:// ridecommand... polaris... com/en-us/update...

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Step 3: Adjust shock clickers (if equipped) for ride quality... For models equipped with monotube shocks, always adjust the rear track shock spring preload to enhance bottoming resistance...

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SHOCK COMPRESSION DAMPING The primary adjustment for overall vehicle balance is torsion spring preload... Perform this adjustment first... After adjusting torsion spring preload to your satisfaction, compression damping adjustments can be made to control ride quality and bottoming resistance...

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To adjust rear torsion spring preload, rotate the three-position camq using the engine spark plug tool... Adjustment is easiest when the cam is rotated from low to medium, and then to high... Rotating directly from low to high will require significantly more effort... Different rate torsion springs are available if a firmer ride is desired... See your dealer for more information...

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OPTIONAL SPRING KITS KIT NUMBER SPRING TYPE DESCRIPTION FITMENT (BY

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FRONT SUSPENSION (IFS) SHOCK ADJUSTMENTS Always perform shock spring preload adjustments with the weight of the vehicle removed from the shock and with the shock at full extension...

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FRONT TRACK SHOCK SPRING SETTINGS Factory settings, combined with user adjustments to the rear track shock spring (RTSS), should be all thats necessary to provide the best riding experience for most riders... The primary adjustment for overall vehicle balance is RTSS preload... Perform this adjustment first...

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The rear track shock of your Matryx vehicle is equipped with a shock clicker... The clicker will increase or decrease compression damping when adjusted... For a stiffer ride, turn the clicker clockwise to increase damping... For a softer ride, turn the clicker counterclockwise to decrease damping...

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REAR REAR SCISSOR STOP (RRSS) (IF EQUIPPED) REAR REAR SCISSOR STOP (RRSS) - ATTRIBUTES Moving the RRSS to a higher position will have the following effects on the suspension: Reduced weight transfer Improved chatter bump ride Improved cornering performance Increased load carrying capacity (2up)

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To decrease weight transfer under acceleration (for improved cornering), rotate the RRSS to a higher position...

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TIP Your dealer can help you with initial setup and additional setup instructions to help you achieve your optimum ride... A scissor stop tool is also available from

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may cut grooves into the handlebar, making it difficult to secure the component... Do not move a handlebar component without first loosening its

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4... With the engine off, test throttle lever movement after tightening the screw...

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3... Be sure the handlebar, brake lever and throttle lever operate smoothly and do not hit the gas tank, windshield or any other part of the machine when turned fully to the left or right... If necessary, adjust the left and right hand controls...

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If changes are made to either the upper or lower chaincase sprocket, the engine management system must be updated to set the new drive ratio... Please see your POLARIS dealer to reprogram the speedometer offset calibration if you install different chaincase sprockets...

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Aggressive studding patterns may require grinding protruding stud bolts flush to prevent idler wheel damage... Maintain track tension on studded tracks on the tight side of the specification to prevent heat exchanger damage... The center of the stud must be at least 1 1/8 inch (2... 9 cm) from any edge of the track, including track window...

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CARBIDE SKAGS A skag is a replaceable bar attached to the underside of the ski to assist in turning the snowmobile and to prevent ski wear caused by contact with roads and other bare terrain... See page 176...

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Excessive heat build-up during the first three hours of operation will damage close-fitted engine parts... Do not operate at full throttle or high speeds for extended periods during the first three hours of use... Vary the throttle openings and vehicle speeds to reduce friction on all close-fitting machined parts, allowing them to break in slowly without damage...

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DRIVE BELT BREAK-IN The break-in period for a new drive belt is 30 miles (48 km)... During this time, vary the throttle position under 50% and limit full throttle use... New drive belts should be washed with warm, soapy water and allowed to air dry prior to use... Always take time to warm up the belt and driveline prior to operating the snowmobile... Free the track and skis from the ground before engaging throttle...

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PRE-RIDE INSPECTIONS PRE-RIDE CHECKLIST Inspect all items on the checklist for proper operation or condition before each use of the snowmobile... Procedures are outlined in the referenced sections...

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PRE-RIDE SUSPENSION INSPECTION Loose nuts and bolts can reduce your snowmobile's reliability and cause needless repairs and down time... Before beginning any snowmobile trip, a visual inspection will uncover potential problems... Check the following items on a weekly basis or before any long trip...

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Squeeze the throttle lever to make sure it compresses evenly and smoothly... When released, the lever should immediately return to the idle position without binding or hesitation... If the throttle does not function smoothly, or if you discover excessive lever freeplay, DO NOTstart the engine... Have the throttle serviced immediately...

Page 130

BRAKE LEVER TRAVEL Squeeze the brake lever... It should move no closer to the handgrip than 1/2 inch (1... 3 cm)q... A smaller distance indicates low brake fluid level or air in the hydraulic system... Refer to the brake bleeding information on ... Your dealer can assist...

Page 131

WARNING If the parking brake lever lock is partially or entirely engaged while riding, the brakes may overheat, resulting in brake damage... In extreme cases it could cause a fire, which could result in serious injury or death... Always ensure that the lever lock is completely disengaged before operating the snowmobile...

Page 132

damage and/or failure... Driving at high speeds for extended periods of time in marginal lubrication could severely damage track rods, break track edges, and cause other track damage... Examples of marginal lubrication would include frozen bodies of water without snow cover, icy trails, and no-snow conditions...

Page 133

OPERATING AREA Before driving away, check your surroundings... Be aware of obstacles and make sure bystanders are a safe distance from the snowmobile...

Page 135

5... If the engine does not start after several attempts, slightly depress the throttle no more than 1/4 inch (2... 54 cm) open while cranking the engine... When the engine starts, immediately release the throttle...

Page 136

RESTARTING AN ENGINE If the rider stops the engine by pushing the engine stop switch down, restart the engine using the normal starting procedure... If the engine fails to start using the normal procedure:

Page 137

A loose track or flying debris could cause serious injury or death... Stand clear of the front of the snowmobile and the moving track... Never hold the snowmobile up or stand behind it while warming up the track... Do not use excessive throttle during warm-up or when the track is free-hanging... Use a stable rear support...

Page 138

Gasoline is highly flammable and explosive under certain conditions... Always exercise extreme caution whenever handling gasoline... Always refuel outdoors or in a well-ventilated area... Always turn off the engine before refueling... Do not overfill the tank... Do not fill the tank neck... Do not smoke or allow open flames or sparks in or near the area where refueling is performed or where gasoline is stored...

Page 139

INTERNATIONAL FUEL For peak performance, POLARIS recommend the use of 95 octane E10 gasoline or higher octane... If lower octane is used, some engine performance will be lost and fuel economy will decrease... Do not use gasoline with higher ethanol rating than E10...

Page 140

The low fuel indicator warning appears on your instrument cluster when the fuel tank reaches 2 gallons of remaining fuel... When this occurs, Polaris recommends riders adjust their riding style to conserve fuel and find the nearest fuel station to re-fuel... Riders who wish to calculate the maximum full-tank vehicle range should do so after the fuel injector break-in and oil enrichment modes expire... See page 123 for more information...

Page 141

If your snowmobile stalls or runs out of fuel, STOP your snowmobile immediately... DO NOTattempt to restart the vehicle without first completing the procedure below... Failure to perform the procedure below after depleting the

Page 142

5... Carefully lift / rotate the snowmobile by pulling the handlebars toward you... The snowmobile should be resting on the left ski at an upward 30-45 degree upward anglew...

Page 143

IMPORTANT Some non-recommended two-cycle engine oils, especially those formulated for warm weather product use, may not provide adequate cold weather pour point properties... These oils may increase the recoil rope pull effort in cold / sub-zero temperatures, resulting in excessive fuel injection events and

Page 144

If an emergency exists and it's necessary to start the engine, the throttle safety switch and engine stop switch may be disconnected from the wire harness... When these switches are disconnected, the ignition key switch must be used to shut off the engine... DO NOTcontinue to operate the snowmobile with the throttle safety switch disconnected... Return the snowmobile to an authorized POLARIS dealer for service as soon as possible...

Page 145

serious injury or death in the event of an accident... If the throttle safety switch does not shut off the engine during a carburetor/throttle system malfunction, immediately push down the engine stop switch... Do not start the engine again

Page 146

3... Push the yellow reverse button on the left-hand control for one second, then release... The engine will automatically reduce RPM and start a reverse rotation... A flashing reverse light on the instrument panel will indicate that the transmission is in reverse...

Page 147

DAILY STORAGE At the end of each ride, park the snowmobile on a level surface and support it at the rear with an appropriate track stand... The track should be suspended approximately 4 inches (10 cm) off the ground...

Page 148

WARNING Objects towed with a rope have no braking power and can easily collide with the rear of the snowmobile or other objects, resulting in serious injury or death... DO NOT tow toboggans, sleds, saucers, or any type of vehicle with a rope... Only a stiff metal pole connecting the towed object and the tow hitch on the snowmobile should be used... If passengers are to be towed on a toboggan or sled, make sure the pole is at least four feet (1... 2 meters) long to prevent any

Page 149

MAINTENANCE EMISSION CONTROL INFORMATION Any qualified repair shop or qualified person may maintain, replace, or repair the emission control devices or systems on your snowmobile... An authorized POLARIS dealer can perform any service that may be necessary for your vehicle... POLARIS also recommends POLARIS parts for emissions related service, however equivalent parts may be used for such service... It is a potential violation of the Clean Air Act if a part supplied by an aftermarket parts manufacturer reduces the effectiveness of the vehicle's emission controls... Tampering with emission controls is prohibited by federal law...

Page 150

The recommended maintenance schedule on your snowmobile calls for service and maintenance inspections at 150 miles (240 km), 500 miles (800 km) and 1000 miles (1600 km)... These inspections should be performed by a qualified service technician... For continued optimum performance and component life, continue maintenance checks at 1000 mile (1600 km) intervals...

Page 151

L = LUBRICATE / I = INSPECT OR ADJUST / R = REPLACE / C = CLEAN Drive / Driven Clutch Clutch Alignment / Offset I I I I Drive Belt Condition / Ride Out Pre-Ride Inspection I Drive / Driven Clutch Condition I C I I C Drive Belt Tension I I I I Engine Engine Mounts I I I I Recoil Handle / Rope / Function I I I I Cylinder Head Bolts I I I Cylinder Base Nuts I I I Ignition Timing BTDC I I I Spark Plugs I I R I Exhaust Pipe I I Exhaust System Retaining Springs I I I I

Page 152

Brake Pads / Brake Disc I I I I Parking Brake Pre-Ride Inspection Brake System I Brake Fluid R Fuel System Throttle Lever / Throttle Cable I I I I I Fuel / Vent Hoses I I I I Oil Hoses I I I Air Box I I I I I Electrical System Auxiliary Shut-Off Pre-Ride Inspection I Throttle Release Switch Pre-Ride Inspection I Ignition Switch Pre-Ride Inspection I Headlights / Brake light / Taillights Pre-Ride Inspection I Hand / Thumbwarmers Pre-Ride Inspection I PERC Reverse System Pre-Ride Inspection I Chassis / Suspension Ski Toe Alignment I I I Front / Rear Suspension Mounting Bolts Pre-Ride Inspection

Page 153

LUBRICATION REAR SUSPENSION Lubricate the suspension pivot shaftsq with POLARIS All Season Grease at the intervals outlined in the Periodic Maintenance Table and before seasonal storage... When operating in heavy, wet snow conditions, lubricate every 500 miles (800 km)...

Page 154

CHAINCASE OIL (IF EQUIPPED) Check and change the chaincase oil at the intervals outlined in the maintenance charts beginning pages... Maintain the oil level at the top of the fill plug hole... POLARIS recommends the use of POLARIS Synthetic Chaincase Lube, or equivalent product...

Page 155

3... Insert the tube of a hand pump oil extractor into the fill hole... Direct the hose toward the bottom front area of the cover, away from the chain/sprocket...

Page 156

3... Remove the right side panel... If equipped with a battery, remove the battery...

Page 157

DO NOT insert a screwdriver or pry bar between the cover and chaincase... Seal damage may occur...

Page 158

10... Using a funnel, slowly add the recommended oil until the fluid begins to overflow... Maximum fluid capacity is 10... 5 oz... (310 ml)...

Page 159

SIDE PANELS To open a side panel, rotate the three 1/ 4-turn fasteners on the outer edges of the side panel... Release the side panel strap at the lower edge of the panel... To remove an open side panel, pull the panel outward to release the tabs at the lower edge of the panel...

Page 160

FUEL FILTER / FUEL LINES This snowmobile is not equipped with an in-line fuel filter... The fuel pump uses a sock-type pickup filter located within the fuel tank... This filter should only require maintenance if debris or foreign material enters the fuel tank... An authorized dealer can provide service...

Page 161

SPARK PLUG INSPECTION Spark plug condition is indicative of engine operation... The spark plug firing end condition should be read after the engine has been warmed up and the vehicle has been driven at higher speeds... Immediately check the spark plug for correct color...

Page 162

COOLING SYSTEM COOLANT POLARIS recommends the use of POLARIS Antifreeze 50/50 Premix... This antifreeze is already premixed and ready to use... Do not dilute with water... If the vehicle will be stored or operated at extremely low temperatures, greater protection may be required... An authorized dealer can assist...

Page 163

FLUSHING THE COOLING SYSTEM To ensure that the coolant maintains its ability to protect the engine, we recommend that the system be completely drained every five (5) years and fresh Antifreeze 50/50 Premix added... This service must be performed when the engine is cold... Your POLARIS dealer can check the coolant when performing the fall tune-up on your snowmobile...

Page 164

EXHAUST SYSTEM Check the exhaust system for wear or damage at approximately 2000 miles (3200 km)... Always allow the engine and exhaust system to cool completely before inspecting...

Page 165

Brake pads must be replaced when the brake pad material becomes thinner than the backing plate (approximately 1/16 inch or 1... 5 mm)... A kit is available for replacing brake pads... Your POLARIS dealer can assist...

Page 166

WARNING Brake failure during operation can result in serious injury or death... Properly functioning brakes are vital to your safety... Be sure the brake pads do not drag on the disc and that brake lever travel is not excessive... Always replace brake pads when the brake pad material becomes thinner than the backing plate

Page 167

store or use a partial bottle... Brake fluid is hygroscopic, meaning it rapidly absorbs moisture from the air... The moisture causes the boiling temperature of the brake fluid to drop, which can lead to early brake fade and the possibility of

Page 168

During the bleeding procedure, keep the brake handle as level as possible... The reservoir must be in this position to minimize the possibility of air entering the system through the reservoir vent...

Page 169

CONSTANT POWER FUSE Models equipped with electric start or an IDD have a battery/electric start wire harness... The 2 amp constant power fuse is located in the hood harness... This fuse protects KEY ON power at the ignition switch... KEY ON power supplies battery voltage to the IDD and GPS puck...

Page 170

DRIVE BELT CONDITION Periodically check the condition and tension of the drive belt... Inspect the belt for signs of excessive wear (frayed edges, missing cogs, cracks) and excessive looseness... Replace the belt if any of these conditions exist... See page 220...

Page 171

7... Turn the wrench clockwise until the sheaves open far enough to remove the belt... If the wrench does not turn readily, rotate the driven clutch counter- clockwise an additional 1/4 turn by hand and try again...

Page 172

damage and/or failure... Driving at high speeds for extended periods of time in marginal lubrication could severely damage track rods, break track edges, and cause other track damage... Examples of marginal lubrication would include frozen bodies of water without snow cover, icy trails, and no-snow conditions...

Page 173

TRACK LUBRICATION The slide rail needs snow for lubrication... Excessive wear indicates insufficient lubrication... A new rail slide can cause faster heat build-up in limited lubrication, resulting in excessive wear...

Page 174

10... Start the engine and slowly rotate the track at least five revolutions... Let the track come to a stop (do not apply brakes)...

Page 175

3... Inspect track alignment by looking through the track window to make sure the rails are evenly spaced on each side... If the track runs to the left, loosen the idler shaft bolt, then loosen the left locknut and tighten the left adjusting bolt... If the track runs to the right, loosen the idler shaft bolt, then loosen the right locknut and tighten the right adjusting bolt...

Page 176

WARNING Improper alignment or adjustment may cause loss of steering control, resulting in serious injury or death... Do not attempt to change the ski alignment... Your

Page 177

2... With only vehicle weight compressing the suspension, measure 10 inches (25... 4 cm) forward from the center of the ski mounting bolt (see in illustration below)... At this point, measure between the skis... This is measurementq...

Page 178

Worn skis and/or skags will adversely affect handling... Loss of vehicle control may result, causing serious injury or death... Your dealer's studding chart can provide the recommended skags... If you install longer or more aggressive carbide skags than the original equipment, it may also be necessary to add track studs to maintain proper vehicle control while turning on hard-packed

Page 179

For ease of inspection, all POLARIS rail slides have a wear limit indicator groove w to indicate the minimum permissible slide thicknessq... Replace the rail slides if they are worn to the top of the groove at any point along their length... Failure to do so may result in permanent damage to the track or rails...

Page 180

BATTERY MAINTENANCE Keep battery terminals and connections free of corrosion... If cleaning is necessary, remove the corrosion with a stiff wire brush... Wash with a solution of one tablespoon baking soda and one cup water... Rinse well with tap water and dry off with clean shop towels... Coat the terminals with dielectric grease or petroleum jelly...

Page 181

2... Remove the two plastic rivetsq securing the console panel to the chassis...

Page 182

BATTERY INSTALLATION When installing a new battery, make sure it's fully charged prior to its initial use... Using a new battery that has not been fully charged can damage the battery and result in a shorter life... It can also hinder vehicle performance... Follow the battery charging instructions before installing the battery...

Page 183

7... Route the BROWN harness ground wiresq and BLACK main battery ground cablew as shown in the image... Both are routed up and over the rubber strap... If the ground wires/cable are routed down the side of the battery, they may interfere with the rear side panel tab... Note the routing of the RED (positive) battery cablee and that the right fender is pulled away from the chassis... Itemr is the constant power fuse connector...

Page 184

LEAD ACID CONVENTIONAL / DRY SHIPPED AGM BATTERY The battery is NOTactivated when packaged A removable cap plugs / strip is located on top of the battery Distilled water is added as required (Lead Acid only) A vent tube is located on the side of battery (Lead Acid only)

Page 185

BATTERY CHARGING To ensure your battery maintains its level of charge, the battery should be connected to a battery tender/trickle charger using the battery tender portq...

Page 186

Engaging the electric starter motor to start the engine Powering the Polaris Interactive Digital Display (PIDD) with the ignition key when the engine is off

Page 187

If you plan to store the vehicle for ONE month or longer, remove the battery from the vehicle and store the battery in a cool / dry location... Continue to maintain the battery with the 2 AMP charger and inspect the battery every 60 days...

Page 188

If you plan to store the vehicle for ONE month or longer, remove the battery from the vehicle and store the battery in a cool / dry location... Continue to maintain the battery with the BatteryMINDer 2012 AGM - 2 AMP charger (or a similar charger) and inspect the battery every 60 days...

Page 189

Treating the fuel system with Carbon Clean during the last few rides of the season ensures the entire fuel system is treated... Then, when it comes time to store the snowmobile, all the rider has to do is completely fill the fuel tank with fresh, non-oxygenated fuel and treat the new fuel with Carbon Clean... It is also recommended riders use non-oxygenated fuel during the last rides of the season as non-oxygenated fuel stores better than oxygenated fuel and resists water vapor absorption... If the rider was unable to treat the fuel system and/or use non-oxygenated fuel at the end of the riding season, the rider should do the following:

Page 190

FOGGING THE ENGINE Fogging the engine with Polaris fogging oil or similar commercial alternative is probably the most important storage step a rider can do to ensure the internal parts of their snowmobiles engine do not rust and corrode during the storage season...

Page 191

1... While the battery can remain installed on the snowmobile, it is recommended the battery be removed from the snowmobile and stored in a cool, and dry location... Removing the battery from the snowmobile facilitates off-site storage of the snowmobile where electricity may not be available to connect a battery tender... In addition, removing the battery allows access to other maintenance items, such as the chaincase chain tensioner bolt...

Page 192

1... Wash the snowmobile with a garden hose and a solution of soapy water... Note that if a pressure washer is used, care should be taken to not point the pressure washer nozzle close to the snowmobile which may force high pressure water into suspension / shock shaft seals and exposed electrical connectors...

Page 193

3... If the snowmobile is equipped with electric start or on-board battery, remove the battery from the battery tender and re-install it back into the battery box... Follow the owners manual for battery installation procedures...

Page 194

12... While the engine is running, verify there are no coolant leaks (on liquid cooled engines)... After engaging the throttle a few times to spin the track, verify the track is aligned with the slide rails...

Page 195

Drive Clutch Center Distance 10... 625 in (27 cm)

Page 196

* Shaded cells indicate factory settings... Use 2 gram lighter shift weights when operating in temperatures above 40 F (5 C)... Drive Clutch Bolt Torque: 80 ft-lbs (108 Nm) Re-torque after running engine...

Page 197

850 INDY VR1/XC 129 AND 137 CAPACITIES AND DIMENSIONS

Page 198

* Shaded cells indicate factory settings... Use 2 gram lighter shift weights when operating in temperatures above 40 F (5 C)... Drive Clutch Bolt Torque: 80 ft-lbs (108 Nm) Re-torque after running engine...

Page 199

650 SWITCHBACK ASSAULT 146 CAPACITIES AND DIMENSIONS

Page 200

* Shaded cells indicate factory settings... Use 2 gram lighter shift weights when operating in temperatures above 40 F (5 C)... Drive Clutch Bolt Torque: 80 ft-lbs (108 Nm) Re-torque after running engine...

Page 201

850 SWITCHBACK ASSAULT 146 CAPACITIES AND DIMENSIONS

Page 202

* Shaded cells indicate factory settings... Use 2 gram lighter shift weights when operating in temperatures above 40 F (5 C)... Drive Clutch Bolt Torque: 80 ft-lbs (108 Nm) Re-torque after running engine...

Page 203

51 10 P0120 This Trouble Code sets when the Throttle Position Sensor Signal changes too rapidly to be correct... The condition can be caused by intermittent connections causing the TPS voltage to jump around between readings... Check for damaged connectors or wiring...

Page 204

110 16 P0217 This Trouble Code sets if the Engine Temperature indicates a Severe Over Temperature Condition... Can be caused by any failure that would cause the engine to overheat... This Trouble Code Does Not indicate a problem with the Engine Temperature Sensor

Page 205

173 3 P0546 This Trouble Code sets if the engine has been running above 3000 RPM for more than 2 minutes and the Exhaust Temperature Sensor Signal is above 4... 90 Volts... Can be caused by Damaged Wiring, a faulty Engine Temperature Sensor or ECU / Connections...

Page 206

636 2 P0335 This Trouble Code sets if the Engine is Running and No Signal is Detected from the 5X Crankshaft Sensor... Can be caused by Damaged Wiring, a faulty Crankshaft Sensor or ECU / Connections... NOTE: If the status of this code is Historic while

Page 207

1352 0 P1336 This Trouble Code Sets if the Engine Controller Reaches the Maximum Detonation Control Limit by Fuel Correction on the Mag Cylinder Can be caused by Incorrect Fuel (low octane or Ethanol content), Low Fuel Pressure or any other condition that can

Page 208

32523 4 P1609 This Trouble Code Sets if the Regulator has detected Low Voltage in the Critical Circuit Can be caused by damaged Regulator wiring or connections, electrical modifications or faulty Regulator

Page 209

520173 0 P1487 This Trouble Code sets if the Exhaust Temperature 2 Signal is greater than 750C Can be caused by a Faulty Exhaust Temperature Sensor/Connections or Lean Air/Fuel Ratio causing high exhaust temperature...

Page 210

520173 14 P1488 This Trouble Code Sets when Exhaust Temperature Sensor 2 signal is 250C greater than Exhaust Temp Sensor 1 signal... The condition can be caused by Damaged Wiring, faulty Exhaust Temperature Sensor or ECU / Connections...

Page 211

520180 16 P2631 This Trouble Code sets if the Exhaust Valve Actuator Position is greater than 30... 0% when trying to achieve Closed position This can be caused by a faulty Exhaust Valve Actuator, Broken Cable or Broken Exhaust Valve Assembly

Page 212

520325 31 P140A This Trouble Code sets if: Valve UP position voltage out of range... Check the following: (1) Measure cable travel length, (2) Verify smooth valve operation by operating the cable by hand through its full travel, (3) Relearn EVIf no problem...

Page 213

523958 5 P3024 This trouble code sets if the ECU detects low current or an open EVActuator Drive circuit... Can be caused by Damaged Wirring, Faulty EVActuator, or ECU / Connections... Inspect EVActuator Drive wires... (White/Green & White/Blue)

Page 214

523956 3 P3033 This trouble code sets if the Exhaust Valve Actuator Position Sensor voltage is greater than 4... 5V for 1sec... Can be caused by Damaged wiring, Faulty EV actuator, or ECU / Connections ... Inspect EVActuator Position Sensor wires... -Power: Red/White -Ground: Brown/White -Feedback: Dark Green/Orange

Page 215

520337 7 P3036 This trouble code sets if the Exhaust Valve Learn values are different from the Exhaust Valve Check Values... Can be caused by an obstruction in the Exhaust Valves, Broken Cable, or broken Exhaust Valve...

Page 216

An internal short has been detected at the right grip heater driver... This would result in a 100% duty cycle output when not expected...

Page 217

TROUBLESHOOTING ENGINE TROUBLESHOOTING Unless you have experience and training in two-cycle engine repair, your dealer can assist if technical problems arise...

Page 218

Hydrostatic lock Fuel may have entered the crankcase while the vehicle was standing or being transported... Drain plug(s) are located on the lower crankcase for emergency draining... Your dealer can perform this service

Page 219

Faulty ignition Install new spark plug(s)... If engine still fails to start, check for spark... If there's no spark, Your dealer can perform this service...

Page 220

Track jammed Foreign object may be caught or the rail slide melted to the track clips due to lack of lubrication...

Page 221

Drive chain loose or worn, sprocket teeth broken Inspect and adjust, or

Page 222

Insufficient warm-up Warm the engine at least five minutes... Put the transmission in neutral to warm belt... In extreme cold weather, take the drive belt off the snowmobile and warm it up... Break snowmobile loose from the snow...

Page 223

Front end pushes Check for worn skags... Check for binding front suspension shafts and steering components, grease all pivot points (elevate front of snowmobile)...

Page 224

Do not add deicers or additives that contain any form of alcohol while using up to 10% Ethanol fuel

Page 225

WARRANTY SERVICE AND WARRANTY INFORMATION OBTAINING SERVICE AND WARRANTY ASSISTANCE Read and understand the service data and the POLARIS warranty information contained in this manual... Contact your POLARIS dealer for replacement parts, service or warranty... Your dealer receives frequent updates on changes, modifications and tips on snowmobile maintenance, which may supersede information contained in this manual... Your dealer is also familiar with POLARIS policies and procedures and will be happy to assist you...

Page 226

REGISTRATION At the time of sale, the Warranty Registration Form must be completed by your dealer and submitted to POLARIS within ten days of purchase... Upon receipt of this registration, POLARIS will record the registration for warranty... No verification of registration will be sent to the purchaser as the copy of the Warranty Registration Form will be your proof of warranty coverage... If you have not signed the original registration and received the customer copy, please contact your dealer immediately... NO WARRANTY COVERAGE WILL BE ALLOWED UNLESS YOUR VEHICLE IS REGISTERED WITH POLARIS... Initial dealer preparation and set-up of your vehicle is very important in ensuring trouble-free operation... Purchasing a machine in the crate or without proper dealer set-up will void your warranty coverage...

Page 227

This warranty also excludes failures resulting from improper lubrication; improper engine timing; improper fuel; surface imperfections caused by external stress, heat, cold or contamination; operator error or abuse; improper component alignment, tension, adjustment or altitude compensation; failure due to snow, water, dirt or other foreign substance ingestion/contamination; improper maintenance; modified components; use of aftermarket components; unauthorized repairs; repairs made after the warranty period expires or by an unauthorized repair center; use of the product in competition or for commercial purposes... Warranty will not apply to any product which has been damaged by abuse, accident, fire or any other casualty not determined a defect of materials or workmanship...

Page 228

THE EXCLUSIVE REMEDY FOR BREACH OF THIS WARRANTY SHALL BE, AT POLARIS OPTION, REPAIR OR REPLACEMENT OFANY DEFECTIVE MATERIALS, COMPONENTS, OR PRODUCTS... THE REMEDIES SET FORTH IN THIS WARRANTYARE THE ONLY REMEDIES AVAILABLE TO ANY PERSON FOR BREACH OF THIS WARRANTY... POLARIS SHALL HAVE NO LIABILITY TO ANY PERSON FOR INCIDENTAL, CONSEQUENTIAL OR SPECIAL DAMAGES OFANY DESCRIPTION, WHETHER ARISING OUT OF EXPRESS OR IMPLIED WARRANTY OR ANY OTHER CONTRACT, NEGLIGENCE, OR OTHER TORT OR OTHERWISE... THIS EXCLUSION OF CONSEQUENTAL, INCIDENTAL AND SPECIAL DAMAGES IS INDEPENDENT FROM AND SHALL SURVIVE ANY FINDING THAT THE EXCLUSIVE REMEDY FAILED OF ITS ESSENTIAL PURPOSE...

Page 229

IF YOU MOVE: If you move to another country, be sure to contact POLARIS Customer Assistance and the customs department of the destination country before you move... Product importation rules vary considerably from country to country... You may be required to present documentation of your move to POLARIS in order to continue your warranty coverage... You may also be required to obtain documentation from POLARIS in order to register your product in your new country... You should warranty register your product at a local POLARIS dealer in your new country immediately after you move to continue your warranty coverage and to ensure that you receive information and notices regarding your vehicle...

Page 230

EXPORTED PRODUCTS EXCEPT WHERE SPECIFICALLY REQUIRED BY LAW, THERE IS NO WARRANTY OR SERVICE BULLETIN COVERAGE ON THIS PRODUCT IF IT IS SOLD OUTSIDE THE COUNTRY OF THE SELLING DEALERS AUTHORIZED LOCATION... This policy does not apply to products that have received authorization for export from POLARIS... Dealers may not give authorization for export... You should consult an authorized dealer to determine this products warranty or service coverage if you have any questions... This policy does not apply to products registered to government officials or military personnel on assignment outside the country of the selling dealers authorized location... This policy does not apply to safety bulletins...

Page 231

U... S... A... EPA EMISSIONS LIMITED WARRANTY This Emissions Limited Warranty is in addition to the POLARIS standard Limited Warranty for your vehicle... POLARIS Industries Inc... warrants that at the time it is first purchased, this emissions-certified vehicle is designed, built and equipped so it conforms with applicable U... S... Environmental Protection Agency emission regulations... POLARIS warrants that the vehicle is free from defects in materials and workmanship that would cause it to fail to meet these regulations...

Page 232

The exclusive remedy for breach of this Limited Warranty shall be, at the exclusive option of POLARIS, repair or replacement of any defective materials, components or products... THE REMEDIES SET FORTH IN THIS LIMITED WARRANTYARE THE ONLY REMEDIES AVAILABLE TO ANY PERSON FOR BREACH OF THIS WARRANTY... POLARIS SHALL HAVE NO LIABILITY TO ANY PERSON FOR INCIDENTAL, CONSEQUENTIAL OR SPECIAL DAMAGES OFANY DESCRIPTION,WHETHER ARISING OUT OF EXPRESS OR IMPLIED WARRANTY OR ANY OTHER CONTRACT, NEGLIGENCE OR OTHER TORT OR OTHERWISE... THIS EXCLUSION OF CONSEQUENTIAL, INCIDENTAL, AND SPECIAL DAMAGES IS INDEPENDENT FROM AND SHALL SURVIVE ANY FINDING THAT THE EXCLUSIVE REMEDY FAILED OF ITS ESSENTIAL PURPOSE...

Page 233

Any qualified repair shop or person may maintain, replace, or repair the emission control devices or systems on your vehicle... POLARIS recommends that you contact an authorized POLARIS dealer to perform any service that may be necessary for your vehicle... POLARIS also recommends that you use only POLARIS parts... It is a potential violation of the Clean Air Act if a part supplied by an aftermarket parts manufacturer reduces the effectiveness of the vehicles emission controls... Tampering with emission controls is prohibited by federal law...

Page 235

MAINTENANCE LOG MAINTENANCE LOG Present this section of your manual to your dealer each time your snowmobile is serviced... This will provide you and future owners with an accurate log of maintenance and services performed on the snowmobile...

Page 236

DATE HOURS TECHNICIAN SERVICE PERFORMED / COMMENTS

Page 237

Before Starting the Engine... 127 Belt Break-In ... 124 Bleeding Hydraulic Brake System ... 166 Brake Inspection ... 163 Brake pads... 163 Brakes ... 128, 163 Brake Fluid... 165 Components... 164 Inspection ... 163 Lever Travel ... 164

Page 238

E Electrical ... 106 Emission Control Information ... 147 Emission Control Label ... 147 Emission Control Maintenance Requirements ... 147 Engine Break-In ... 123 Engine Restarting ... 134 Engine Serial Number ... 9 Engine Starting ... 133 Engine Stop Switch... 130, 143 Engine-Cooling Actions... 65 Environment Preservation ... 7 Exhaust System ... 162 Exported Products ... 228 Extended Idle Engine Shutoff ... 41

Page 239

I IFS Shock Factory Clicker Settings ... 111 IFS Shock Spring Settings ... 111 Ignition Lock ... 41 Ignition Lock System ... 49 Ignition Switch ... 33, 130 Inadequate Snow Conditions ... 22 Indicator Lamps ... 43 Information Display Area ... 45 Inspection, Pre-Ride... 125 Instrument Cluster ... 41 Intake Screens... 158 Intake Silencer ... 24

Page 240

Rear Track Shock Adjustments... 109 Recoil Rope ... 130 Recoil Rope Inspection ... 130 Recommended Maintenance ... 148 Registration... 224 Reporting Safety Defects (Canada)... 29 Restarting ... 134 Reverse Operation... 144 Ride Command All Settings Button ... 84 Badge Panel... 79 Before You Ride ... 67 Buttons ... 72 Controls Tab ... 80 Display Mode... 80 Fuel Setting... 83 Gauge Screen ... 74 Gauge Screen Configuration... 75 Gauge View Mode ... 77 General Settings ... 100 Group Ride ... 91 Heated Grips ... 82 Icon Bar... 78 Map Orientation ... 89 Map Screen... 88 Map Zoom ... 88 Music... 84 Notifications Tab... 81 Overview ... 71 Phone Screen... 85 Pin Activated Security System (P... A... S... S... ) ... 103 Polaris Icon ... 81 Settings... 98 Time Settings... 101 USB Port ... 106 Vehicle Info ... 99 Vehicle Settings ... 102 Waypoints... 90

Page 241

T Temperature Charts ... 26 Tether Switch... 130 Throttle Block Alignment ... 118 Throttle Lever ... 127, 142 Throttle Lever Inspection... 127 Throttle Safety Switch... 143 Throttle Safety Switch Inspection ... 127 Tools... 37 Towing ... 145 Track Alignment ... 173 Inspection ... 170 Lubrication ... 171 Tension ... 171

Page 243

For your nearest Polaris dealer, call 1-800-POLARIS (765-2747) or visit www... polaris... com

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