Polaris 120 XC Owner's Manual PDF

Pages 82
Year 2001
Language(s)
English en
1 of 82
1 of 82

Summary of Content for Polaris 120 XC Owner's Manual PDF

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All machines, no matter how well engineered, require a certain amount of mainte- nance... Before the snowmobile is used, take a few minutes to read through this manual and familiarize yourself and your child with maintenance and operation procedures... It may be the most important time spent in knowing how to keep your machine running perfectly every day...

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As the owner of a new Polaris vehicle, you are entitled to a FREE two-year mem- bership in thePolaris PROFamily----thePreferredRegisteredOwnersFamily... This is an owners program for Polaris consumers like you, people who have chosen the finest recreational vehicle available, and who share an interest in Polaris and its products...

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Parents should sit down with their child and read the Riders Section with them before letting them use this snowmobile... Parents should also read the Adult Section before allowing their child to ride this snowmobile...

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PARENTS: Review the information in this manual with any child who may be operating the snowmobile... It is up to you to teach your child the proper and safe way to ride a snowmobile... You must set boundaries and adhere to them, keeping your childs safety foremost in your mind... Never allow your child to operate this machine without adult supervision...

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2... Throttle Control - This makes your snowmobile go forward when you press it with your thumb... You must alwaysmake sure the throttle control does not stick before you operate your snowmobile... Read more about it on page R--7...

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8... Tether Strap/Switch - This must always be attached snugly to your wrist and your machine when you are riding... If you fall off your snowmobile, the tetherwill pull off the switch and the engine will stop... Put one end of the tether strap around your wrist... The other end must be attached to the snowmobile... Always attach the tether strap before you ride...

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1... Hood - The hood covers the moving and hot parts of the engine and must be securely latched before you ride the snowmobile...

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6... Seat / Storage - You sit on the seat... When the engine isnt running, you can take the cushion off and put things under the seat in the special compartment...

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1... Pushing down on the engine stop switch on the right handlebar control will shut off the engine...

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You are almost ready to have an adult start your snowmobile... Before the snowmobile is started for the first time, you must do a PRE-OPERATION CHECK... In fact, every time you ride your snowmobile you must have an adult help you check these things before starting it... Lets learn about these things now...

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Make sure your track and skis are not frozen to the snow... Stand behind the machine and lift up on the back of the sled... This will free the track if it is frozen to the ground... Turn the handlebars tomove the skis back and forth tomake sure they arent frozen... If any of this is hard too, have an adult help you...

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Now you are ready to learn about riding a snowmobile... You will learn what you can do and what you cannot do... The adult with you is your teacher... You must listen and pay attention or youwont be safewhen you ride... Remember that safetywhile you ride is the most important thing... Lets learn how to ride!

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" Always wear the right kind of clothing when you are riding your snowmobile... You will need a good helmet with a face shield or goggles... Wear a warm jacket and snowpants... Make sure your clothing fits properly... If it is too small, it could keep you from moving easily... If it is too big, it could hang down and get caught in the track or another moving part... Never, ever wear a long scarf... Wear warm snowmobile boots and gloves... Make sure your boot laces are tied... If you have long hair, be sure to tie it up...

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"Dont ride your snowmobile on roads or over railroad tracks... Your snowmobile makes noise that will keep you from hearing cars, trucks or trains that may be coming towards you...

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" Learn where there are lakes, rivers, ponds and ditches in your driving area... Stay away from them... Never ride on frozen water... You could get hurt or you could even die... All ice can be dangerous!

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Learn how to ride safely and correctly... Learn how to use your handsand armsas signals... Readand understand your Owners Manual...

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SAFETY ALERT The following precautionary signal words are used throughout this manual to con- vey the following messages: It is very important this owners manual is read and thoroughly explained to each operator(s) of this machine...

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CAUTION: Although your Polaris has been designed to provide operators with a safe, reliable snowmobile,much of its safety depends on the operator and parents... Improper use of this snowmobile or failure tomaintain it in good operating condition can result in injury... To reduce this possibility, read the following important safety information and make certain the operators and guests are familiar with all the warnings, cautions and safe operating procedures... They must also understand the consequences and risks if they choose to ignore or neglect this information...

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D Read and understand warnings and the Owners Manual before operation... Severe injury or death can result from not heeding the warnings... D This vehicle is intended for daylight use in restricted off-road areas clear of obstacles... primarily on snow and not on frozen bodies of water, by a child of not less than 6 years of age who is in the presence of, and in active supervision of an adult... Use of this vehicle onpublic trails, streets, roads,and highways can be hazardous and is prohibited by law in most cases... D Do not start or operate this vehicle without guards and shields in position, or with hood not latched in place... D This vehicle is intended for one operator only, no passenger... Passengers, cargo, or towed objects can cause loss of control... D Verify proper operation of all controls before starting the engine... D When operating this vehicle, the operator shall wear suitable protective clothing including an approved safety helmet and visor or goggles... D Securely attach the safety lanyard to the childs body before starting the engine... D This vehicle can be operated between 0 and 8mph (13 km/h)... However, it is recommended that the adult supervising the child regulate themaximum speed to match the experience and ability of the child... Instructions for regulating maximum speed are provided in the Owners Manual... D The Auxiliary Shut Off Switch is the primary means of stopping this vehicle in case of an emergency and is located on the top of the throttle control assembly... Depress the switch to stop the engine and vehicle... Routinely check this switch for proper function with the engine idling...

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WARNING Teach the operators to perform the following Pre-Operation Check before starting the engine each time before they ride... If they do not check their machine properly before riding, they could be seriously injured or killed...

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Read and make sure the operators understand the Owners Manual completely before allowing anyone to operate this snowmobile... It is also a good idea to read it periodically to reinforce the information... It is very important for to familiarize the operator and guests with the cautions and warnings pertaining to your machine as well as safe operating procedures... We have attempted to provide you with as much information as possible to alert you to the safety requirements of snowmobil- ing...

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Check for proper operation of the steering system by manually turning the skis completely to the right and to the left... If difficulty is encountered, check for ice and snow buildup which may be obstructing the steering linkage... Make certain all greasable components are properly lubricated...

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WARNING The drive chain guard is designed to protect the operator from metal parts in the event of a drive chain failure... Although the chance of failure is extremely remote, do not defeat the purpose of the guard by removing it... It is provided for the safety of the child...

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WARNING Safe operation of this rider-active vehicle requires good judgement and physical skills... Persons with cognitive or physical disabilities who operate this vehicle have an increased risk of overturns and loss of control which could result in serious injury or death...

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Improper operator position on the snowmobile can be the source of serious injury... Operating a snowmobile does require skill and balance for proper control, and an improper position can seriously reduce the childs ability to control the snowmobile... The riding positionmay vary as the operator becomesmore skilled; but undermost conditions the proper position is to be seated, feet on the running boards, and in a comfortable position for proper throttle, brake, and steering control...

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WARNING The snowmobile engine compartment contains moving parts... Shields and guards have been provided for safety, but it is still possible to carelessly get your hands or fingers into a moving chain or a rotating shaft... For this reason never attempt adjustments with the engine running... Serious personal injuries can result... The proper method is to turn off the ignition, raise the hood, make the adjustment, secure shields and guards, secure the hood, and then re-start the engine to check its operation... The same is true of track alignment... If the track must be re-aligned, it is recommended that this service be performed by your dealer...

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Wire fences are a serious hazard... Teach your child to always be on the alert for fences... Single strands are especially dangerous, since there can be a great distance between posts... Guy wires on utility poles are also difficult to distinguish... Teach your child to reduce speed when traveling near poles, posts, or other obstacles...

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Windchill/Temperature Charts The following information is provided as a guide to determine what temperatures are dangerous when riding your snowmobile...

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Whenever the machine has been parked for some length of time, especially over- night, always shake loose the skis and track for the operator before attempting to put the machine into motion... The throttle will require some pressure to move the machine... Teach the operator not to be afraid of applying pressure to the throttle but at the same time, teach them not to be too forceful with the throttle which could cause the machine to lurch forward...

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It is dangerous to operate on ice or under slippery conditions... If ice or slippery con- ditions are unavoidable, use extreme caution and operate at speeds no faster than a walk... Never attempt an abrupt change of direction on a slippery surface... The chance of spin-out increases under these conditions... Being able to turn a snow- mobile depends primarily on the skis being in snow... On hard surfaces, such as ice, the ability to turn is reduced and themachine will not turn very well... In this situation it may be best to dismount andmove either the front or rear of the machine to point it in the proper direction...

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WARNING Traveling on hilly terrain is not recommended... It takes some maneuvering of body weight that a child may not be capable of, which will leave the child at risk... If traveling on hilly terrain is unavoidable, teach your child to exercise ex- treme caution as well as the proper operating procedure as outlined below...

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In order to bemeaningful, all regulations require the cooperation of thesnowmobile owner... Muffling systems, designed to reduce noise levels, should not be altered or removed... Snowmobile drivers must be aware that they have a public responsi- bility to operate their snowmobiles with concern for others... As a snowmobile oper- ator you may not realize the sound of your snowmobile may annoy non-snowmo- bilers... We are attempting to do our part through the manufacture of quieter machines, and we also ask your help in the effort to further reduce the impact of noise...

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Refer to the illustrations on the following pages...

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3... Recoil Starter Handle 4... Choke Button 5... Gas Cap 6... Ignition Switch 7... Brake Lever 8... Tether Switch 9... Hood Hold-Down 10... Console 11... Tether Strap

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Engine Break-In The break-in period for your new snowmobile is defined as the first ten hours of op- eration, or the time it takes to use the first two tanks full of gasoline... No single action on your part is as important as a proper break-in period... Careful treatment of a new engine will result in more efficient performance and longer life for the engine... Per- form the following procedures carefully...

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D Avoid operating on ice or hard-packed surfaces, roads, etc... The absence of lubrication and cooling by snow will lead to overheating of the slide rail and track resulting in premature wear and failure... Reduce speeds and fre- quently drive into fresh snow to allow adequate cooling and lubrication of the slide rail and track surfaces...

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Proper carburetor adjustment is critical, since a mixture too lean (toomuch air, too little fuel) will result in overheating of the combustion chamber causing pre-ignition of the fuel... This results in piston burning, bearing failure, or complete engine fail- ure... A lean mixture can be the result of fuel line restrictions, foreign matter in the carburetor, etc...

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Proper carburetor adjustment is critical, since a mixture too lean (toomuch air, too little fuel) will result in overheating of the combustion chamber causing pre-ignition of the fuel... This results in piston burning, bearing failure, or complete engine fail- ure... A lean mixture can be the result of fuel line restrictions, foreign matter in the carburetor, etc...

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Most Polaris engines are designed to run on 87 octane non-oxygenated or 89 oc- tane oxygenated pump gasoline... There is a great deal of variability in the quality of the 87 octane gasoline available across the country... We encourage the use of premium fuel when possible...

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NOTE: It is up to you, the parent, to teach your child the proper and safe way to ride a snowmobile... You must set boundaries and adhere to them, keeping your childs safety foremost in yourmind... Never allow your child to operate thismachine without adult supervision...

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CAUTION Do not pull the starter rope to its full extended position or allow it to snap back into the housing as damage can result... The recoil starter rope is full length... Be sure onlookers are standing clear while pulling the recoil starter...

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While seated in a normal riding position, and with the engine id- ling, hold the throttle lever pin stationary by exerting pressure on the pivot pin in the direction shown in the illustration (B)... Ap- ply a slight amount of throttle opening... A properly functioning switch must shut down the en- gine...

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If the engine does not start, and throttle safety switch malfunc- tion is suspected, return thema- chine to an authorized Polaris dealer for service... If an emer- gency exists and it is necessary to start the engine, the throttle safety switch and engine stop switch may be disconnected from the wire harness...

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D Park the snowmobile on a level surface and support it at the rear so the track is sus- pended approximately 4 (20 cm) from the ground...

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WARNING Be sure the rear support is stable... Stand clear of the front of the machine and the moving track... Never hold the snowmobile up or stand behind it while performing this procedure... Do not use too much throttle during warm up or when track is free-hanging... A loose track or flying debris could cause serious personal injury or death...

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If during the course of the warranty period parts failures occur as a result of owner neglect in performing the recommended periodicmaintenance, the cost of such re- pairs shall be borne by the owner... Please consider the recommended mainte- nance program illustrated on the following pages as a preventative maintenance program designed to maintain the performance and reliability of your snowmobile in the years to follow...

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1... Track alignment and adjustments 2... Drive chain tension 3... Brake operation, adjustment 4... Headlight and taillight 5... Emergency shut off switch operation and throttle safety switch function 6... Suspension mounting bolts (tightness) 7... Steering arm and tie rod ends (check for play or looseness) 8... Ski saddle and spindle bolts (tighten) 9... Suspension rear limiter strap bolt (tighten) 10... Condition of front and rear limiter straps 11... Throttle cable condition 12... Engine oil level (between crosshatches) 13... Clutch (grease) 14... Chain (oil)

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NOTE: The following chart is aguide basedon average riding conditions... Youmay need to increase frequency based on riding conditions... Inspection may reveal the need for replacement parts... Always use genuine Polaris parts available from your Polaris dealer...

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Check front & rear limiter strap condition, tighten loose bolts

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Present this section of your manual to your dealer each time your snowmobile is serviced... This will provide you and future owners with an accurate log of mainte- nance and services performed on the unit...

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In selecting a spark plug heat range for production, a manufacturer is forced to as- sume that the engine is going to operated under extreme heavy duty conditions... This protects the engine from internal damage in the event that the purchaser actu- ally does operate the engine in this manner... This selection however, could cause the customerwho normally operates the engine undermediumor light duty to have spark plug failure... Refer to yourOwnersManualSupplement for the specific spark plug to be used in your machine...

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Wet Fouled The insulator tip is black... A damp oily film covers the firing end... There may be a carbon layer over the entire nose... Generally, the electrodes are not worn... Causes could be excessive oil, use of non-recommended injection oil, excessive idling, idle too low or too rich, or weak ignition output...

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Proper carburetor adjustments include the following: D Carburetor component changes for specific altitude and ambient temperatures; D Choke adjustment; D Air screw settings, if applicable; D Idle RPM adjustments; D Throttle safety switch checks and servicing; D Throttle block to throttle flipper clearance adjustment

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At approximately 50 hours it is a good idea to check the exhaust system for wear or damage... To inspect, allow engine and exhaust system to coolcompletely... Open the hood and inspect the muffler and pipes for cracks or damage... Check for weak or missing retaining springs or damper/support grommets...

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If excessive brake lever to brake block clearance is evident, the brake cable or cali- per should be adjusted using the following methods...

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band... Route cable through cable housing... Install spring on cable and thread cable through set screw barrel... Hold opposite slotted side with flat tool such as a feeler gauge... Insert 1/8 allen wrench... Pull cable through barrel and tighten... The brake band is adjusted correctly when there is 1/8-3/8 (3-10mm) brake lever free play, and clearance between brake lever and block with lever fully depressed is no more than 3/4 (1... 9cm)... See page 2... 4 for brake cable adjustment procedure... Torque band bolt 6 ft... lbs... (83 kg2-m)

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Inspect the chain... The chain should have 1 of deflection as shown... If not, loosen the nut on the chain tensioner and raise until 1 of deflection is attained... Tighten nut to 15-18 ft... lbs...

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S Lubricate Point A every 15 hours of operation with a small amount of Polaris Premium All Season Grease...

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The best and safest way to clean your sled is with a garden hose and a pail of mild soap and water... Use a professional type washingmitten, cleaning the upper body first and the lower parts last... Rinse with water frequently and dry with a chamois to prevent water spots... NOTE: If warning labels are damaged, contact your a Po- laris dealer for free replacement...

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When preparing your snowmobile for off-season storage we recommend that you add a fuel conditioner/stabilizer or Premium Carbon Clean (2871326) to the fuel tank... Follow the instructions on the can... Run the engine for five minutes to get ad- ditives through the entire fuel system... Then top off with fresh fuel and turn the fuel valve to off...

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Fall Tune-Up To obtain maximum performance and use from your snowmobile, we encourage you to arrange for a fall service tune-up with your Polaris dealer... He has an experi- enced and trained service technician who is interested in keeping your machine in peak operating condition...

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WARNING Your snowmobile is propelled by a revolving track which must be partially ex- posed for proper operation... Serious injuries may be caused by operator care- lessness resulting in hands, feet, or clothing becoming entangled in the track... Be alert... Remember, being properly seated keeps you clear of the track...

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9... Check track alignment (side to side) by comparing the distance from the guide clip to Hi-fax on both sides... Readjust until centered...

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Before checking track tension,make certain the track contains no objects that could be thrown out while the track is rotating... Keep clear of track... This includes but is not limited to hands, tools, feet and clothing... Make certain no one is standing close to the machine while the track is rotating...

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Track Warm Up When storing your snowmobile outside overnight, it is recom- mended that the track bewarmed up prior to driving the snowmo- bile... This reduces drive clutch wear... To warm up the track, safe- ly support the rear of thesnowmo- bile off the ground, start the en- gine and abruptly engage the clutch... Allow the track to turn for a short time... Release the throttle, apply the brakes and shut the en- gine off prior to lowering it to the ground...

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To inspect track rods, carefully examine the track along the en- tire length of each rod, bending the track and inspecting for breakage... The three most com- mon places where breakage oc- curs are shown in the illustration...

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The slide rail is de- signed to operate in conditions with adequate snow cover to provide sufficient lubrication... Excessive wearmay be due to improper alignment, improper track adjustment or machine operation on surfaces without snow... Take the ma- chine to your dealer for Hi-fax replacement...

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With handlebars in straight ahead position and measuring from the straight edge of the skis, the measurement be- tween the skis at point H should be 1/8 inches greater than point I, as shown on the following page... NOTE: This mea- surement should be tak- en with the vehicle weight compressing the suspension... If the skis are misaligned, we rec- ommend that your dealer make the necessary ad- justments...

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The skag is a replaceable bar attached to the underside of the ski... The purpose of the skag is to assist in turning the snowmo- bile and to prevent the wearing away of the ski caused by con- tact with roads and other bare terrain... We recommend that skags be checked once a week to maintain positive steering characteristics... Skags must be replaced when worn to half their original diameter... NOTE: See dealer track studding and skag chart for recommended skags...

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Suspension Lubrication Tomaintain rider comfort and to retard wear of the pivot shafts, the suspension piv- ot shafts should be lubricated with Polaris Premium All Season Grease, PN 2871066, several times during the season and again before summer storage each year... The riding characteristics of the snowmobilewill beaffected by lack of lubrica- tion of these shafts... NOTE: A grease gun kit complete with grease and adaptors is available to lubricate all fittings on Polaris snowmobiles... Order PN 2871312...

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Suspension Lubrication points are indicated by aL...

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Engine Troubleshooting The following information is provided to help you identify probable causes forques- tions you may have about the operation of your snowmobile... See your Polaris dealer with any additional questions you may have...

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Maintenance Items Gas Dock Recoil Starter Handle Tool Pouch Tool Kit Carbon Clean Grease, Premium All Season Anti-Corrosive Lubricant/Electrical Connector Lubricant Fuel Deicer, Isopropyl Fuel Stabilizer, 16 oz... Fogging Oil T-9 Metal Protectant Metal Polish Grease Gun Kit (All Season) 3 oz... Refill Grease Cartridge (All Season) 3 oz... Oil, 0W-40 Synthetic

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Read carefully and understand the service data and the Polaris Warranty con- tained in this manual... Contact your Polaris dealer in matters pertaining to replace- ment parts, service orwarranty... He is constantly kept up to date on changes,modi- fications and tips on snowmobile maintenance, which may supersede information contained in this manual... He is familiar with our policies and procedures and will be happy to assist you...

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WARRANTY COVERAGE AND EXCLUSIONS: LIMITATIONS OF WARRANTIES AND REMEDIES The warranty excludes any failures that are not caused by a defect in material or workmanship... This warranty does not cover accidental damage, normal wear and tear, abuse or improper handling... This warranty also does not cover any snowmo- bile that has been altered structurally, neglected, improperly maintained, used for racing, or used for purposes other than for which it was manufactured, or for any damages which occur during trailer transit or as a result of unauthorized service or the use of unauthorized parts... In addition, this warranty does not cover physical damage to paint or finish, stress cracks, tearing or puncturing of upholsterymateri- al, corrosion, or defects in parts, components or snowmobile due to fire, explosions or any other cause beyond Polaris control...

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HOW TO OBTAIN WARRANTY SERVICE If your snowmobile requires warranty service, you must take it to a Polaris dealer authorized to repair Polaris snowmobiles... When requesting warranty service you must present your copy of the Warranty Registration form to the dealer... (THE COST OF TRANSPORTATION TO AND FROM THE DEALER IS YOUR RE- SPONSIBILITY)... Polaris suggests that you use your original selling dealer; how- ever, you may use any Polaris Servicing Dealer to perform warranty service...

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Polaris now is offering an extended engine service contract which provides the fol- lowing benefits: D Additional engine protection beyond the original twelve month warranty... D Backed by the strength of Polaris - no third party involvement... D Repairs use only genuine top quality Polaris parts... D Peace of mind... The Polaris Extended Service Contract is honored by all autho-

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A--2-A--3... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... Service and Warranty Information A--60... ... Skag Replacement A--53... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... Ski Skags A--53... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... Spark Plug Selection A--35... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... Speed Regulation A--24... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... Starting a Cold Engine A--25... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... Starting a Warm Engine A--25... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... Steering Inspection and Adjustment A--52 Steering System A--52... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... Stop Switch A--18... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... Storage A--43-A--44... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... Maintenance A--30-A--55... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... Suspension Components A--55... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... Suspension Lubrication A--54... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... Throttle Cable Lubrication A--38... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... Throttle Cable Pivot Slug A--38... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... Throttle Safety Switch A--5, A--26... ... ... ... ... ... Towing A--45... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... Track Alignment A--48... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... Track and Suspension A--46... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... Track Inspection A--50... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... Track Lubrication A--51... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... Track Tension A--46... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... Track Warm Up A--49... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... Transporting A--45... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... Troubleshooting A--56... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... Understanding Warnings R--9-R--13, A--1 Vehicle Nomenclature A--17... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... Warranty A--61-A--63... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... Washing A--43... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... Waxing A--43... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... Windchill/Temperature Charts A--12... ... ... ... ... Wiring Diagram A--59... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ...

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