Polaris 120 v6 Owner's Manual PDF

Pages 92
Year 2004
Language(s)
English en
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1 of 92

Summary of Content for Polaris 120 v6 Owner's Manual PDF

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A Polaris owners Web site, designed just for YOU!

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Copyright 2003 Polaris Sales Inc... All information contained within this publication is based on the latest product information at the time of publication... Due to constant improvements in the design and quality of production components, some minor discrepancies may result between the actual vehicle and the information presented in this publication... Depictions and/or procedures in this publication are intended for reference use only... No liability can be accepted for omissions or inaccuracies... Any reprinting or reuse of the depictions and/or procedures contained within, whether whole or in part, is expressly prohibited... Printed in U... S... A...

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ADULT SECTION 25... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... Pre-Ride Check 26... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... Operation Warnings 30... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... Component Identification 42... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... Break-In Period 44... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... Operation 46... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... Maintenance 51... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... Accessories 79... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... Troubleshooting 79... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ...

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WELCOME Dear Parents: We believe your children should have the opportunity to enjoy The Way Out experience along with you... Weve provided this owners manual to assist you and your children in learning about the safe operation and care of your new Polaris snowmobile... Please review the information in this manual with any child who may operate the snowmobile... Help your children learn to operate the snowmobile with safety as a top priority... Help them also learn to show respect for our environment and for the rights of others while operating the snowmobile... Since the operator will be a newcomer to the exciting winter sport of snowmobiling, please be sure he/she understands this information before riding the snowmobile... Never allow a child to operate the snowmobile without adult supervision... The preventive maintenance program outlined in this manual is designed to ensure that all critical components on your childs snowmobile are thoroughly inspected at various intervals... For safe and enjoyable operation of the vehicle, be sure to follow all of the instructions and recommendations in this manual... A table of Polaris-recommended products is provided on page 82... If you have any questions about the snowmobile, contact a Polaris dealer for assistance... This Owners Manual contains instructions for minor maintenance, but major repairs are covered in the Polaris Service Manual and should be performed by a Factory Certified MSD (Master Service Dealer) Technician...

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IMPORTANT Parents should sit down with their children and read the Youth Section with them before allowing them to use this snowmobile... Parents must also read the Adult Section before allowing their children to ride this snowmobile...

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INTRODUCTION Important Notes for Owners and Drivers PARENTS: Do not allow anyone under the age of six (6) to operate this machine... Review the information in this manual with any child who may be operating the snowmobile... It is up to you to teach any operator the proper and safe way to ride a snowmobile... You must set boundaries and adhere to them, keeping the operators safety foremost in your mind... Never allow a child to operate this machine without adult supervision... These units are not designed for adult use... Serious damage to the vehicle may occur if the maximum rider weight capacity is exceeded... The maximum rider weight capacity is 140 lbs... (63... 5 kg)...

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Noise Level One of the most publicized subjects with regard to snowmobiles is noise... The Society of Automotive Engineers (SAE), which is the standard-setting body for snowmobiles, has recommended that snowmobiles conform to prescribed sound levels... This Polaris snowmobile has been engineered to conform to these SAE standards... In order to be meaningful, all regulations require the cooperation of the snowmobile owner... Muffling systems, designed to reduce noise levels, should not be altered or removed... Snowmobile drivers must be aware that they have a public responsibility to operate their snowmobiles with concern for others... As a snowmobile operator you may not realize the sound of your snowmobile may annoy non-snowmobilers... We are attempting to do our part through the manufacture of quieter machines, and we also ask your help in the effort to further reduce the impact of noise...

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INTRODUCTION Preservation of the Environment Environmental Protection As part of the continuing environmental education campaign, we are encouraging state and provincial governments across the snowbelt to adopt rigorous safety training programs which also encourage protection of our environment, wildlife and vegetation... Snowmobile clubs and other organizations are working together to protect our environment... It is very important that we encourage them as well as become actively involved ourselves... Teach your child the following: Respect your snowmobile; respect your environment; and you will earn the respect of everyone...

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INTRODUCTION Vehicle Identification Numbers The frame vehicle identification number (VIN) and engine serial number are important for model identification when registering your vehicle, when obtaining insurance, and when ordering replacement parts... In the event your vehicle is stolen, these numbers are essential to the recovery and identification of your vehicle... Remove the spare key and store it in a safe place... Your key can be duplicated only by mating a Polaris key blank with one of your existing keys... If both keys are lost, the ignition switch must be replaced... See your Polaris dealer... Please record your snowmobile identification numbers below for future reference:

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Equipment Modifications All Polaris snowmobiles have been designed and tested to provide safe operation when used as directed... Failure of critical machine components may result from operation with any modification; especially those that increase speed or power... Theres a significant possibility of loss of control at higher speeds... We are concerned for the safety of our customers and for the general public... Any modifications to the original equipment of the vehicle create a substantial safety hazard and increase the risk of bodily injury... Therefore, we strongly recommend that consumers do not install on a Polaris snowmobile any equipment that may increase the speed or power of the vehicle, or make any other modifications to the vehicle for these purposes... The warranty on your Polaris snowmobile is terminated if any equipment has been added to the vehicle, or if any modifications have been made to the vehicle, that increase its speed or power...

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SAFETY Maintenance Program As with all snowmobiles, caution must be observed to ensure operator safety... Particular caution must be taken to make sure that the snowmobile is in excellent operating condition at all times... We strongly recommend that the operator, as well as an adult, check major and vital safety components before each use of the vehicle... We also recommend that you strictly follow the maintenance schedule outlined in this manual to ensure that all critical components on the snowmobile are thoroughly inspected by your dealer at various mileage intervals... This snowmobile is not a toy... It is a well-engineered and well-constructed recreational vehicle... The information in this manual is provided to aid you in its safe operation...

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CAUTION Improper use of this snowmobile or failure to maintain it in good operating condition can result in injury... To reduce this possibility, read the important safety information on the following decal and make sure all operators and guests are familiar with all warnings, cautions and safe operating procedures... They must also understand the consequences and risks if they choose to ignore or neglect this information...

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SAFETY The following signal words and symbols appear throughout this manual and on your vehicle... Your safety is involved when these words and symbols are used... Become familiar with their meanings before reading the manual...

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2... Throttle Control - The throttle control makes your snowmobile go forward when you press it with your thumb... You must always make sure the throttle control does not stick before you operate your snowmobile... Read more about it on page 19...

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8... Tether Strap/Switch - The tether strap must always be attached snugly to your right wrist and to your snowmobile every time you drive... If you fall off your snowmobile, the tether strap will pull away from the switch and the engine will stop...

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YOUTH SECTION Know Your Snowmobile Lets learn more about the parts of your snowmobile before we talk about riding...

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running... It helps others see you when youre riding during daylight, but its not supposed to be strong enough to help you see in the dark... Drive your snowmobile only in the daylight...

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Lets review the three ways to stop your snowmobile: 1... Push the stop switch down... 2... Pull off the tether strap... 3... Turn the key off...

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n Make sure the throttle doesnt stick... Push the throttle lever toward the handlebar and then let it go... The lever should come right back to where it was before you pushed it... If it comes back slowly or stays close to the handlebar, you have a sticky throttle... This means that something is wrong or broken... Dont start the snowmobile until an adult fixes the sticky throttle...

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n Have an adult check the gas level to see if your snowmobile needs more... Children should never add their own gasoline... This must always be done by an adult... Before anyone adds gasoline to your snowmobile they must read the instructions and warnings on page 46 in this Owners Manual...

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YOUTH SECTION Riding Rules Now youre ready to learn about driving your Polaris snowmobile... There are some things you can do and there are some things you must never do... Rules are very important when youre driving a snowmobile... Adults have riding rules, too... The rules help keep us safe when we ride... You must be at least six (6) years old before you can ride this snowmobile... The adult with you is your teacher... Always pay attention to what your teacher says so you can learn how to always drive safely... Lets learn how to ride!

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" Always wear the right kind of clothing when youre riding your snowmobile... Youll need a good helmet with a face shield or goggles... Wear a warm jacket and snowpants... Make sure your cloth- ing fits properly... If its too small, it could keep you from moving easily... If its too big, it could hang down and get caught in the track or another moving part... Never, ever wear a long scarf... Wear warm snowmobile boots and gloves, and make sure your boot laces are tied... If you have long hair, be sure to tie it up...

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" Ride your snowmobile only where you know its safe to drive and where you have per- mission to drive... Be careful of the things around you...

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YOUTH SECTION Riding Rules Learn how to ride safely and correctly... Learn how to use your hands and arms as signals... Read and understand your Owners Manual...

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ADULT SECTION Pre-Ride Check Its up to you, the adult, to teach your child the proper and safe way to ride a snowmobile... You must set boundaries and adhere to them, keeping your childs safety foremost in your mind... Never allow your child to operate this machine without adult supervision...

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Read and make sure the operators understand the Owners Manual completely before allowing anyone to operate this snowmobile... Its also a good idea to review it periodically to reinforce the information... Its very important to familiarize the operator and guests with the cautions and warnings pertaining to the machine as well as safe operating procedures... Weve attempted to provide you with as much information as possible to alert you to the safety requirements of snowmobiling...

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Test the throttle safety switch system on a daily basis before the machine is used... While seated in a normal riding position, and with the engine idling, hold the throttle lever pin stationary by exerting pressure on the pivot pin in the direction shown in the illustration (A)... Apply a slight amount of throttle opening... A properly functioning switch must shut down the engine... The throttle safety switch is designed to stop the engine whenever all pressure is removed from the throttle lever and the throttle cable or valve does not return to the normal closed position... If excessive play develops in the throttle cable, the safety switch may be activated and will prevent the engine from starting... If the engine doesnt start and throttle safety switch malfunction is suspected, return the machine to an authorized Polaris dealer for service... If an adult must start the engine in an emergency situation, the throttle safety switch and engine stop switch may be disconnected from the wire harness... In this situation, the ignition key switch must be used to shut off the engine... Be sure to reconnect the safety switches and have the snowmobile serviced before operating the vehicle again...

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Test the engine stop switch before each use of the snowmobile... To stop the engine in an emergency, push down on the stop switch (A)... This will ground out the ignition and bring the engine to a quick stop... To restart the engine, the switch must be pulled up to the ON position...

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WARNING The drive chain guard is designed to protect the operator from metal parts in the event of a drive chain failure... Although the chance of failure is extremely remote, do not defeat the purpose of the guard by removing it... It is provided for the safety of the child...

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WARNING Safe operation of this rider-active vehicle requires good judgement and physical skills... Persons with cognitive or physical disabilities who operate this vehicle have an increased risk of overturns and loss of control, which could result in serious injury or death...

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Measure the clearance between the lever and brake block... Inspection should be made with the lever firmly depressed... Distance A should be no more than 3/4 (1... 9 cm)... Excessive travel indicates a need to adjust the brake cable... Refer to the mechanical brake adjustment information on page 59...

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Improper operator position on the snowmobile can be the source of serious injury... Operating a snowmobile does require skill and balance for proper control, and an improper position can seriously reduce the childs ability to control the snowmobile... The riding position may vary as the operator becomes more skilled, but under most conditions the proper position is to be seated with both feet on the running boards, in a comfortable position for proper throttle, brake and steering control...

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WARNING The snowmobile engine compartment contains moving parts... Shields and guards have been provided for safety, but it is still possible to carelessly get your hands or fingers into a moving chain or a rotating shaft... For this reason never attempt adjustments with the engine running... Serious personal injuries can result... The proper method is to turn off the ignition, raise the hood, make the adjustment, secure shields and guards, secure the hood, and then re-start the engine to check its operation... The same is true of track alignment... If the track must be re-aligned, it is recommended that this service be performed by your dealer...

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The operator should be aware that there are state and local laws governing snowmobile operation and that these laws should be followed... They have been established for the protection of all snowmobile riders... Most states offer a snowmobile safety course for children... Check your state or county agencies for this service... This vehicle is intended for daylight use only... Check both the headlight and taillight of the machine to ensure proper operation... IMPORTANT: The headlight and taillight are intended only to increase the visibility of the 120 PRO X during daylight operation... Do not operate the snowmobile in the dark...

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ADULT SECTION Operation Warnings Wire fences are a serious hazard... Teach your child to always be on the alert for fences... Single strands are especially dangerous, since there can be a great distance between posts... Guy wires on utility poles are also difficult to distinguish... Teach your child to reduce speed when traveling near poles, posts, or other obstacles... Teach your child that the sound of the machine will make it difficult to hear the sound of approaching vehicles... Do not allow your child to operate the snowmobile on or near roads and railroad tracks... Teach your child what it means to drive defensively... Never tailgate and always allow ample stopping distances... Your child must be taught to always be alert and pay attention to the driving area ahead... When teaching inexperienced operators to ride, set up a nearby predetermined course... Establish boundaries and make sure the operator(s) know and understand them... Make sure they know how to drive and control the snowmobile before you allow them to make supervised longer distance runs... Teach them proper snowmobile courtesy... Its a good idea to predetermine some hand signals as a way to communicate with your child while giving instruction... It may be difficult for your child to hear your voice over the sound of the snowmobile and through a helmet...

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ADULT SECTION Operation Warnings Windchill/Temperature Charts The following information is provided as a guide to determine what temperatures are dangerous when riding your snowmobile... WIND CHILL CHART (F)

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5 0 -5 -10 -15 -20 -25 -30 -35 -40 Speed in KPH Equivalent Temperature (C)

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Powder Snow Operation This snowmobile is designed to operate best on snow... Maneuverability is attained by the steering, skis, and the shifting of the drivers body weight... Maximum control will be attained by shifting body weight... Maneuverability will change for lighter operators... If the machine becomes stuck in snow, free the running board area and step down the snow in front of the machine so that when the throttle is opened the machine will be able to climb out... The operator can then get back on the machine and continue... It is best to encourage the operator to stay on established riding areas to avoid the possibility of getting stuck...

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WARNING Before allowing your child to drive the machine, be sure that ice and snow are not interfering with the steering... Manually turn the skis to the left and right... If difficulty is encountered, check for ice and snow buildup which may be obstructing the steering linkage...

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It is dangerous to operate on ice or under slippery conditions... If ice or slippery conditions are unavoidable, use extreme caution and operate at speeds no faster than a walk... Never attempt an abrupt change of direction on a slippery surface... The chance of spin-out increases under these conditions... Being able to turn a snowmobile depends primarily on the skis being in snow... On hard surfaces, such as ice, the ability to turn is reduced and the machine will not turn very well... In this situation it may be best to dismount and move either the front or rear of the machine to point it in the proper direction... Teach your child to respect the unknown... Children must be taught that they are not to venture out on their own in unapproved territory... They must learn that they must never ride a snowmobile on a frozen body of water... You and the driver of the machine should know and understand that severe injury or death can result if the snowmobile and its occupant break through the ice...

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When riding downhill, the operator must keep the speed at a minimum... It is important to apply just enough throttle to keep the clutch engaged while descending the hill... This will allow use of the engines compression to help slow the machine, and keep the snowmobile from rolling freely downhill...

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1... Hood 8... Rear Suspension 2... Headlight 9... Nosepan 3... Windshield 10... Trailing Arm 4... Handlebar 11... Skis 5... Seat 12... Front Bumper 6... Storage (under seat) 13... Rear Bumper 7... Taillight 14... Snow Flap 8... Track

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CAUTION Never mix brands of oil... Serious chemical reactions can cause oil passage blockage, resulting in severe engine damage and voiding of engine warranty... The only oil recommended for this system is Polaris Premium 4 All Season Synthetic oil... This oil has been specially formulated for all temperatures and has extreme cold flow characteristics... Do not operate at prolonged full throttle for the first three hours of operation... Vary the throttle openings and machine speeds... This will reduce friction on all close fitting machined parts and allow them to break in slowly without damage... Avoid operating on ice or hard-packed surfaces, roads, etc... The absence of lubrication and cooling by snow will lead to overheating of the slide rail and track resulting in premature wear and failure... Reduce speeds and frequently drive into fresh snow to allow adequate cooling and lubrication of the slide rail and track surfaces... Drive with extra caution during the break-in period... Perform regular checks on fluid levels, lines, and all important areas of the machine...

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NOTE: Always use Polaris Premium 4 All Season Synthetic Oil or any class SE, SF (API classification) or higher grade oil... If multi-grade oil is used, oil consumption will increase when the ambient temperature is high...

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WARNING Gasoline is highly flammable and explosive under certain conditions... Always exercise extreme caution whenever handling gasoline... Always refuel with the engine stopped, and outdoors or in a well ventilated area... Do not smoke or allow open flames or sparks in or near the area where refueling is performed or where gasoline is stored... Do not overfill the tank... Do not fill the tank neck... If gasoline spills on your skin or clothing, immediately wash it off with soap and water and change clothing... If you get gasoline in your eyes or if you swallow gasoline, see your doctor immediately... Never start the engine or let it run in an enclosed area... Engine exhaust fumes are poisonous and can cause loss of consciousness or death in a short time... Turn the fuel valve off whenever the vehicle is stored or parked...

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ADULT SECTION Operation Speed/Performance Regulation Adults have the responsibility for teaching children the proper and safe way to ride a snowmobile... Please set boundaries and adhere to them, keeping your childs safety foremost in your mind... Never allow a child to operate this machine without adult supervision... Under certain circumstances it may be necessary for an adult to regulate the speed and acceleration of the snowmobile by moving the governor lever spring... Use the following procedure to set the performance level...

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6... Apply the brakes and vary the engine RPM slightly with the throttle to aid in warm-up... When the engine idles smoothly, push the choke all the way in... NOTE: To prevent excessive wear on the clutch components, dont engage the clutch while performing the warm-up...

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ADULT SECTION Operation Emergency Stopping Procedures The following chart lists methods for stopping the engine in the event of an emergency...

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WARNING A loose track or flying debris could cause serious personal injury or death... Be sure the rear support is stable... Stand clear of the front of the machine and the moving track... Never hold the snowmobile up or stand behind it while performing this procedure... Do not use too much throttle during warm-up or when the track is free-hanging...

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ADULT SECTION Maintenance Polaris Recommended Maintenance Program Your Polaris snowmobile has been engineered and manufactured by skilled Polaris personnel to the highest degree of performance and reliability possible... In order to maintain this level of quality, your machine must have regular service and maintenance inspections... The Polaris Recommended Maintenance Program is intended to assist you in performing routing maintenance that will ensure trouble-free enjoyment of your Polaris snowmobile... If the recommended regular maintenance and service checks are followed, you will be doing your part in keeping this snowmobile in excellent operating condition at all times... The recommended maintenance schedule for your snowmobile calls for a service and maintenance inspection at 50 hours, at 100 hours and at 150 hours... These inspections should be performed by a qualified service technician... NOTE: Any replacement parts and labor incurred, with the exception of authorized warranty repairs, are the responsibility of the registered owner... If parts failures occur during the course of the warranty period as a result of owner neglect in performing the recommended periodic maintenance, the cost of repairs shall be the responsibility of the owner... Please read and follow the recommended maintenance program illustrated on the following pages to maintain the performance and reliability of your Polaris snowmobile...

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ADULT SECTION Maintenance Careful periodic maintenance will help keep your vehicle in the safest, most reliable condition... Inspection, adjustment and lubrication of important components are explained in the following chart and in the maintenance section of this manual... Service and adjustments are critical... If youre not familiar with safe service and adjustment procedures, have a qualified dealer perform these operations... NOTE: The following chart is a guide based on average riding conditions... You may need to increase frequency based on riding conditions... When inspection reveals the need for replacement parts, we recommend the use of genuine Polaris parts, available from your Polaris dealer...

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Check front and rear limiter strap condition, tighten loose bolts

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ADULT SECTION Maintenance Present this section of your manual to your dealer each time your snowmobile is serviced... This will provide you and future owners with an accurate log of maintenance and services performed on the snowmobile...

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1... Normal The normal insulator tip is gray, tan or light brown... There will be few combustion deposits... The electrodes are not burned or eroded... This indicates the proper type and heat range for the engine and the service... NOTE: The tip should not be white... A white insulator tip indicates overheating, caused by use of an improper spark plug or incorrect carburetion adjustments...

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Exhaust System At approximately 50 hours, check the exhaust system for wear or damage... To inspect, allow the engine and exhaust system to cool completely... Open the hood and inspect the muffler and pipes for cracks or damage... Check for weak or missing retaining springs or damper/support grommets...

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ADULT SECTION Maintenance Carburetor Proper carburetor adjustment is critical, since a mixture too lean (too much air, too little fuel) will result in overheating of the combustion chamber causing pre-ignition of the fuel... This results in piston burning, bearing failure, or complete engine failure... A lean mixture can be the result of fuel line restrictions, foreign matter in the carburetor, etc... A mixture too rich (too much fuel, too little air) is also unfavorable because it can foul plugs and cause generally poor engine performance... All carburetors have been pre-set at the factory for adequate fuel supply... Higher altitude operation may require different adjustment and settings... The number stamped in the end of the main jet indicates the jet size that was installed at the time of manufacture... For questions about optional jetting for conditions in your area, see your Polaris dealer... 1... Engine 2... Carburetor Correct setup provides engine RPM within its given power band at full throttle settings and also provides maximum efficiency and operation at all other throttle openings... See your dealer for carburetor adjustments, which may include the following: S Carburetor component changes for specific altitude and ambient temperatures;

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Choke/Cable Lubrication Lubricate the choke slide and cables occasionally as shown... Operate the choke intermittently before turning the machine off... This draws moisture out of the choke plunger area and reduces the possibility of the choke becoming frozen...

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ADULT SECTION Maintenance Brake Adjustment If excessive brake lever to brake block clearance is evident, the brake cable should be adjusted... If proper adjustment cannot be achieved by using the following methods, check the brake band for excessive wear... Your snowmobile dealer can install a new brake band when necessary...

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ADULT SECTION Maintenance Chain Tensioner Inspect the chain... The chain should have 1 of deflection as shown... If not, loosen the nut on the chain tensioner (A) and raise until 1 (B) of deflection is attained... Tighten nut to 15-18 ft... lbs... (20-24 Nm)... When the chain comes within 1/8 (C) of the muffler mount bracket (D) on the chassis, the chain has stretched and must be replaced... Inspect the sprockets as they also become worn and often need replacement when the chain is replaced...

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ADULT SECTION Maintenance Lubrication NOTE: Driveline noise is normal and inherent in a chain drive system such as this machine uses... To ensure long life of the snowmobiles driveline, lubricate as follows: S Lubricate Point A every 15 hours of operation with a small amount of Polaris Premium All Season Grease...

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Washing Your Snowmobile Keeping your snowmobile clean will not only improve its appearance but it can also extend the life of various components... With a few precautions, your sled can be cleaned much like an automobile... The best and safest way to clean your sled is with a garden hose and a pail of mild soap and water... Use a professional type washing mitten, cleaning the upper body first and the lower parts last... Rinse with water frequently and dry with a chamois to prevent water spots... NOTE: If warning labels are damaged, contact your a Polaris dealer for free replacement... If a high pressure type car wash system is used, extreme care must be taken to avoid water damage to the hood, console, nosepan, decals, and warning labels... Many expensive repair bills can result from using high pressure detergent systems... NOTE: If a high pressure car wash is used, grease all zerk fittings immediately after washing... Also run the vehicle to evaporate any water that might have entered the engine or exhaust system...

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Electrical Connections Separate electrical connector blocks and clean corrosive build up from connectors... Lubricate or pack connector blocks with Nyogelt grease and re-connect... Replace worn or frayed electrical wire and connectors... Be sure wiring harness is properly secured away from sharp edges, steering linkage, moving parts, and hot exhaust...

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ADULT SECTION Maintenance Engine Proper off-season preparation of the engine and fuel system is vital to the prevention of rust and corrosion formation on precision engine parts during storage... Without proper storage, jet restriction can cause lean conditions and very poor slow speed driving quality... When preparing your snowmobile for off-season storage, we recommend that you add fuel conditioner/stabilizer or Premium Carbon Clean (PN2871326) to the fuel tank... Follow the instructions on the can... Run the engine for five minutes to get additives through the entire fuel system... Then top off the tank with fresh fuel... NOTE: This procedure is performed best when the front of the machine is elevated and the engine is tilted rearward...

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ADULT SECTION Maintenance Carburetor Protection During Off-Season Storage When preparing your snowmobile for off-season storage we recommend that you add a fuel conditioner/stabilizer or Premium Carbon Clean (2871326) to the fuel tank... Follow the instructions on the can... Run the engine for five minutes to get additives through the entire fuel system... Then top off with fresh fuel and turn the fuel valve to OFF... If stabilizer is not used, make sure the fuel valve is OFF and drain the carburetor... Catch fuel in a container or shop cloth... Remove the spark plug and pour approximately 5cc of engine oil into cylinder... Slowly pull the recoil starter so the engine turns over two or three times... Reinstall plug securely... Position piston at bottom dead center (BDC)... Observe all fire safety rules when draining carburetor... See gasoline warnings on page 46... Slowly pull the recoil starter handle until resistance is felt... Leave it in that position... Clean the engine thoroughly with an oiled cloth... If stabilizer is not used, turn the fuel valve to OFF... Remove the strainer cup, place the strainer over a container, and open the strainer cock to discharge fuel from the fuel tank... Remove the carburetor float chamber bolt from the bottom and discharge fuel from the carburetor... Replace bolt...

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Fall Tune-Up To obtain maximum performance and use from your snowmobile, we encourage you to arrange for a fall service tune-up with your Polaris dealer... He has an experienced and trained service technician who is interested in keeping your machine in peak operating condition...

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WARNING Your snowmobile is propelled by a revolving track, which must be partially exposed for proper operation... Serious injuries may be caused by the operators hands, feet or clothing becoming entangled in the track... Be alert... Always sit properly on the seat...

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let the track stop rotating by itself (do not apply brakes)... 5... Check track alignment (side to side) by comparing the distance

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WARNING When performing the following checks and adjustments, stay clear of all moving parts to avoid serious personal injury... Before checking track tension, make sure the track contains no objects that could be thrown out while the track is rotating... Keep clear of track... This includes but is not limited to hands, tools, feet and clothing... Make sure no one is standing close to the machine while the track is rotating...

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ADULT SECTION Maintenance Track Warm Up When storing your snowmobile outside overnight, it is recommended that the track be warmed up prior to driving the snowmobile... This reduces drive clutch wear... To warm up the track, safely support the rear of the snowmobile off the ground, start the engine and abruptly engage the clutch... Allow the track to turn for a short time... Release the throttle, apply the brakes and shut the engine off prior to lowering it to the ground...

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Using a hoist or jackstand, safely lift and support the rear of the snowmobile off the ground... Rotate the track by hand to check for any possible damage... To inspect track rods, carefully examine the track along the entire length of each rod, bending the track and inspecting for breakage... The three most common places where breakage occurs are shown in the illustration... Check the track clips and tighten if loose... If any rod damage is found, the track should be replaced...

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ADULT SECTION Maintenance Hi-Fax Replacement The 120 PRO X uses XTRA Lite style Hi-Fax... When any area of the Hi-Fax is worn to 7/16 (1... 1 cm), it should be replaced... This will save wear on other vital components... The slide rail is designed to operate in conditions with adequate snow cover to provide sufficient lubrication... Excessive wear may be due to improper alignment, improper track adjustment or machine operation on surfaces without snow... Take the machine to your dealer for Hi-fax replacement...

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ADULT SECTION Maintenance Track Lubrication Track failure, loss of vehicle control and braking ability can result from extended use of this vehicle on surfaces providing marginal lubrication between hi-fax and track guide clips... Examples of marginal lubrication would include lakes without snow cover, icy trails and no-snow conditions... The slide rail is designed to operate in conditions with adequate snow cover in order to provide sufficient lubrication... Excessive wear indicates insufficient lubrication... New hi-fax can cause faster heat build up in limited lubrication than used hi-fax, resulting in excessive wear... NOTE: Track damage or failure caused by operation on ice or poor lubrication conditions may void the track warranty...

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ADULT SECTION Maintenance Steering Inspection and Adjustment The steering assembly of the machine should be checked periodically for loose nuts and bolts... See A,B,C,D,E, F, and G in illustration at right... With handlebars in straight ahead position and measuring from the straight edge of the skis, the measurement between the skis at point H should be 1/8 inches greater than point I, as shown on the following page... NOTE: This measurement should be taken with the vehicle weight compressing the suspension... If the skis are misaligned, we recommend that your dealer make the necessary adjustments...

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upward to access the adjuster bolts... If additional room is required, unzip one of the handlebar pad zippers and roll the pad to the side...

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ADULT SECTION Maintenance Ski Skags The skag (A) is a replaceable bar attached to the underside of the ski... The purpose of the skag is to assist in turning the snowmobile and to prevent the wearing away of the ski caused by contact with roads and other bare terrain... We recommend that skags be checked once a week to maintain positive steering characteristics... Skags must be replaced when worn to half their original diameter... NOTE: See dealer track studding and skag chart for recommended skags...

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ADULT SECTION Maintenance Suspension Lubrication To maintain rider comfort and to retard wear of the pivot shafts, the suspension pivot shafts should be lubricated with Polaris Premium All Season Grease several times during the season and again before summer storage each year... The riding characteristics of the snowmobile will be affected by lack of lubrication of these shafts... NOTE: A grease gun kit complete with grease and adaptors is available to lubricate all fittings on Polaris snowmobiles... See page 82... IMPORTANT: Make it a weekly practice to check for loose bolts and nuts on the suspension system... If any loose bolts are found on the rail be sure to clean the threads and apply Loctite 262 before tightening...

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ADULT SECTION Maintenance Suspension Components Suspension Lubrication points are indicated by a L... 1... Front Limiter Strap 8... Rail Bumper 2... Torsion Spring Sleeves 9... Torque Arm 3... Torsion Spring 10... Rail 4... Carrier Wheel 11... Hi-fax 5... Rear Limiter Strap 12... Toe Guard 6... Spacer 13... Idler Wheel 7... Adjuster Bolts

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ADULT SECTION Accessories Maintenance Items and Accessories The tools and maintenance items mentioned in this book, as well as a long line of other Polaris accessories, are available at your Polaris dealer...

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Engine and Cooling Engine Model Number EH122PM013 Alternator Output 50 watt @ 3600 rpm Bore x Stroke 60 x 43 mm Displacement 121 cc Carburetor Model Mikuni BV18 Main Jet 72... 5 Pilot Jet 50 Cutaway 170 Throttle Valve Fuel Screw 1... 5 Turns Pilot Air Jet 1... 3 Idle RPM 1600 +/- 200 Cooling Air Cylinders 1 Ignition Timing 23_ BTDC @ 3600 rpm Ignition Type Flywheel Magneto (solid state) Oil Injection 0W-40 Synthetic Spark Plug NGK BR6ES Spark Plug Gap ... 028 in... (... 70 mm) Minimum Fuel Requirement 87 Octane Non-Oxygenated or 89 Octane Oxygenated

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2871281 Premium 4 Synthetic 0W-40 Engine Oil (4-Cycle)(qt... )

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WARRANTY Service And Warranty Information Obtaining Service and Warranty Assistance Read and understand the service data and the Polaris warranty information contained in this manual... Contact your Polaris dealer for replacement parts, service or warranty... Your dealer receives frequent updates on changes, modifications and tips on snowmobile maintenance, which may supersede information contained in this manual... Your dealer is also familiar with Polaris policies and procedures and will be happy to assist you... When contacting us about parts, service, or warranty, always provide the following information:

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Limitations of warranties and remedies This warranty excludes any failures not caused by a defect in material or workmanship... The warranty does not cover accidental damage, normal wear and tear, abuse or improper handling... The warranty also does not cover any snowmobile that has been structurally altered, neglected, improperly maintained, used for racing or used for purposes other than for which it was manufactured... The warranty does not cover any damages that oc- cur during trailer transit or as a result of unauthorized service or parts... In addition, this warranty does not cover physical damage to paint or finish, stress cracks, tearing or punc- turing of upholstery material, corrosion or defects in parts, components or the snowmo- bile due to fire, explosions or any other cause beyond Polaris control... This warranty does not cover the use of unauthorized lubricants, chemicals, or fuels that are not compatible with the snowmobile... The exclusive remedy for breach of this warranty shall be, at Polaris exclusive option, repair or replacement of any defective materials, or components or products... THE REM- EDIES SET FORTH IN THIS WARRANTY ARE THE ONLY REMEDIES AVAIL- ABLE TO ANY PERSON FOR BREACH OF THIS WARRANTY... POLARIS SHALL HAVE NO LIABILITY TO ANY PERSON FOR INCIDENTAL, CONSEQUENTIAL OR SPECIAL DAMAGES OF ANY DESCRIPTION, WHETHER ARISING OUT OF EXPRESS OR IMPLIED WARRANTY OR ANY OTHER CONTRACT, NEG- LIGENCE, OR OTHER TORT OR OTHERWISE... Some states do not permit the exclu- sion or limitation of incidental or consequential damages or implied warranties, so the above limitations or exclusions may not apply to you if inconsistent with controlling state law...

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How to Obtain Warranty Service If your snowmobile requires warranty service, you must take it to a Polaris dealer autho- rized to repair Polaris snowmobiles... When requesting warranty service you must present your copy of the Warranty Registration form to the dealer... (The cost of transportation to and from the dealer is YOUR responsibility)... Polaris recommends that you use your original selling dealer; however, you may use any Polaris Servicing Dealer to perform warranty service... Please work with your dealer to resolve any warranty issues... Your dealer will contact the appropriate personnel at Polaris if additional assistance is needed... This warranty gives you specific legal rights, and you may also have other rights which vary from state to state... If any of the above terms are void because of state or federal law, all other warranty terms will remain in effect...

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WARRANTY Conditions and Exclusions In order to qualify for warranty, the product must have been properly set up and tested by a Polaris Dealer (if applicable)... Failure of any dealer to perform the required vehicle Pre-- Delivery Inspection, perform all applicable service bulletins and have the consumer sign the PDI form prior to delivery may void the warranty... Failure to provide proof of re- quired periodic maintenance upon request may result in denial of warranty coverage... Use of the recommended Polaris products for lubrication and maintenance as directed by the Owners manual is highly recommended... Should a failure occur during the warranty period resulting from the use of non-recommended products, warranty coverage may be denied... Warranty does not apply to parts exposed to friction surfaces, stresses, environmental conditions and/or contamination... The following items are excluded from warranty con- sideration if the failure was due to wear or not the direct result of a defect: Skis Ski wear rods Tracks Slide rails Suspension components Finished and unfinished surfaces Brake components Carburetor/Throttle body components Seat components Engine components Clutches and components Drive belts Steering components Hydraulic components Batteries Circuit breakers/Fuses Light bulbs/Sealed beam lamps Electronic components Idler wheels

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WARRANTY Polaris Second Year Engine Service Contract Second Year Engine Service Contract is standard on all eligible new and unused snowmobiles that were Snow Checked through an authorized Polaris dealer during the March/April Snow Check promotion... The free Second Year Engine Service Contract is honored by all authorized Polaris snowmobile dealers in North America and is transferable 120 days after the original purchase date, free of charge, through any Polaris snowmobile dealer... Coverage on Snow Check units is automatic... Although you do not receive a warranty card, your dealership should have printed a copy of the warranty registration form... This form is your proof of warranty...

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How to Get Service In the Country where your vehicle was purchased: Warranty or Service Bulletin repairs must be done by an authorized Polaris dealer... If you move or are traveling within the country where your vehicle was purchased, Warranty or Service Bulletin repairs may be requested from any authorized Polaris dealer who sells the same line as your vehicle... Outside the Country where your vehicle was purchased: If you are traveling temporarily outside the country where your vehicle was purchased, you should take your vehicle to an authorized Polaris dealer... You must show the dealer photo identification from the country of the selling dealers authorized location as proof of residence... Upon residence verification, the servicing dealer will be authorized to per- form the warranty repair... If You Move: If you move to another country, be sure to contact Polaris Customer Assistance and the customs department of the destination country before you move... Vehicles importation rules vary considerably from country to country... You may be required to present docu- mentation of your move to Polaris Industries in order to continue your warranty cover- age... You may also be required to obtain documentation from Polaris Industries in order to register your vehicle in your new country... If Purchased From A Private Party: If you purchase a Polaris product from a private citizen outside of the country in which the vehicle was originally purchased, all warranty coverage will be denied...

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S Safety 10-13... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... Safety Decals 12... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... Service and Warranty Information 83-84 Signal words 13... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... Skag Replacement 76... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... Ski Skags 76... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... Spark Plugs 55-56... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... Specifications 80-81... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... Speed Regulation 47... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... Starting a Cold Engine 48... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... Starting a Warm Engine 48... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... Starting the Engine 48... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... Steering Inspection and Adjustment 74... Steering System 73... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... Storage 49, 63-64... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... Maintenance 51-78... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... Suspension Components 78... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... Suspension Lubrication 77... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... Symbols 13... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ...

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