Dell PowerEdge 1750 Server Service Manual PDF

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Summary of Content for Dell PowerEdge 1750 Server Service Manual PDF

Dell PowerEdge 1750 Systems Service Manual System Overview

Basic Troubleshooting

Indicators, Codes, and Messages

Removing and Replacing System Components

Jumpers and Connectors

Using the System Setup Program

Notes, Notices, and Cautions

Information in this document is subject to change without notice.  2003 Dell Inc. All rights reserved.

Reproduction in any manner whatsoever without the written permission of Dell Inc. is strictly forbidden.

Trademarks used in this text: Dell, the DELL logo, PowerEdge, and Dell OpenManage are trademarks of Dell Inc.; Intel is a registered trademark and Xeon is a trademark of Intel Corporation; Microsoft, Windows, and MS-DOS are registered trademarks of Microsoft Corporation; Novell and NetWare are registered trademarks of Novell, Inc.; Red Hat is a registered trademark of Red Hat, Inc.

Other trademarks and trade names may be used in this document to refer to either the entities claiming the marks and names or their products. Dell Inc. disclaims any proprietary interest in trademarks and trade names other than its own.

Initial release: 23 Sep 2003 Last revised: 19 Nov 2003

NOTE: A NOTE indicates important information that helps you make better use of your computer.

NOTICE: A NOTICE indicates either potential damage to hardware or loss of data and tells you how to avoid the problem.

CAUTION: A CAUTION indicates a potential for property damage, personal injury, or death.

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Basic Troubleshooting Dell PowerEdge 1750 Systems Service Manual

  Initial User Contact

  External Visual Inspection

  Observing the Boot Routine

  Internal Visual Inspection

  Running the System Diagnostics

 Performing basic troubleshooting procedures can often reveal the source of a system problem or indicate a starting point for servicing the system.

 Perform the following procedures in the order presented.

Initial User Contact

 Ask the user to describe the problem and the conditions under which it occurs. Then perform the following steps:

1.  Have the user back up the data on the hard drive, if possible.

 Refer the user to the documentation provided with the operating system or application software for information about backing up data.

2.  Have the user duplicate the problem.

 If the user cannot duplicate the problem, proceed to "External Visual Inspection."

3.  Observe the user's actions for errors such as typing an incorrect key combination or entering a command incorrectly.

 If the problem is a result of user error, instruct the user in the proper procedure. If it is not, proceed to "External Visual Inspection."

External Visual Inspection

1.  Inspect the status indicators for indications of component malfunction.

2.  Turn off the system and all attached peripherals.

3.  Verify that all power cables are properly connected to the system, peripherals, and their power sources.

4.  Ensure that cables are properly connected to devices.

5.  If a monitor is used, inspect the monitor controls for obvious damage or improper settings.

 For proper settings of the monitor controls, see the monitor documentation.

6.  If a keyboard is used, inspect the keyboard to ensure that keys are not sticking.

 If keys are sticking, replace the keyboard.

7.  Inspect the system and peripherals for signs of physical damage.

 If a peripheral is damaged, see the peripheral documentation. If the system is damaged, see "Internal Visual Inspection."

Observing the Boot Routine

1.  If the system is off, turn on all peripherals and the system. If the system is on, reboot the system.

2.  During the boot routine, observe the system for any of the following indications:

l  Beep codes indicate an error condition. See "System Beep Codes."

l  System error messages indicate problems or provide status information. See "System Messages."

l  Drive indicators light when data is transferred to or from the drives. If a drive indicator fails to light during the boot routine, troubleshoot the appropriate drive subsystem.

l  Three indicators on the upper-right corner of the keyboard should flash momentarily.

 If the indicators flashed, proceed to the next step.

 If the indicators did not flash, replace the keyboard with a keyboard that you know works. If the problem persists, troubleshoot the system

NOTE: Most steps in this procedure require observation of system functions and indications, some of which can occur simultaneously. You may need to reboot the system several times to complete all of these steps.

power supply. If the troubleshooting procedure indicates that the system power supply is working, troubleshoot the memory. See the Installation and Troubleshooting Guide.

3.  Observe the power-supply indicators.

 If the fault indicator(s) is lit, troubleshoot the system power supply. See the Installation and Troubleshooting Guide.

Internal Visual Inspection

 Visual inspection of a system's interior can often locate the source of a problem, such as a loose expansion card or cable connector. See "Jumpers and Connectors" to locate components referenced in the inspection procedure.

1.  If your system has the optional front bezel installed, remove the bezel. See "Optional Front Bezel."

2.  Turn off the system, including attached peripherals, and disconnect the system from the electrical outlets.

3.  Open the system covers. See "Opening the System Covers."

4.  Ensure that all components (memory modules, expansion cards, and processors) are properly and securely installed. See "Removing and Replacing System Components."

5.  Verify that all jumpers are set correctly. See "Jumpers and Connectors."

6.  Ensure that all cables inside the system are firmly attached to their appropriate connectors.

7.  Close the system covers. See "Closing the System Covers."

8.  If the system has an optional front bezel, install the bezel. See "Replacing the Bezel."

9.  Reconnect the system to the electrical outlet and turn on the system, including attached peripherals.

 If the problem is resolved, no further steps are necessary. If the problem is not resolved, proceed to "Observing the Boot Routine."

Running the System Diagnostics

 You can run system diagnostics from either the utility partition on your hard drive or from a set of diskettes that you create from the Dell OpenManage Server Assistant CD. 

From the Utility Partition

1.  As the system boots, press during POST.

2.  From the utility partition's main menu under Run System Utilities, select Run System Diagnostics.

From the Diagnostics Diskettes

1.  Create a set of diagnostics diskettes using the Dell OpenManage Server Assistant CD.

 See "Using the Dell OpenManage Server Assistant CD" in the User's Guide for information on creating diskettes.

2.  Insert the first diagnostics diskette.

3.  Reboot the system.

 When you start system diagnostics, a message is displayed stating that the diagnostics are initializing. Next, the Diagnostics menu appears. The menu allows you to run all or specific diagnostics tests or to exit system diagnostics.

System Diagnostics Testing Options

 To select an option from the Diagnostics menu, highlight the option and press , or press the key that corresponds to the highlighted letter in the option.

NOTICE: Before proceeding with the internal visual inspection, save all open files and exit all open applications, if possible.

CAUTION: Only trained service technicians are authorized to remove the system cover and access any of the components inside the system. See your System Information Guide for complete information about safety precautions, working inside the computer, and protecting against electrostatic discharge.

CAUTION: The microprocessor and heat-sink assembly can get extremely hot during system operations. Ensure that both components have had sufficient time to cool before touching them.

CAUTION: When handling the processor and heat-sink assembly, avoid sharp edges on the heat sink.

NOTE: Before you read the rest of this section, start system diagnostics so that you can see the utility on your screen.

 Table 2-1 provides a brief explanation of testing options.

Table 2-1. System Diagnostics Testing Options  

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Testing Option Function

Quick Tests Performs a quick check of the system. Select Test All Devices and then select Quick Tests. This option runs device tests that do not require user interaction and that run quickly. Use this option to quickly assess the source of your problem.

Test One Device Tests a particular device.

Extended Tests Performs a more thorough check of the system. Select Test All Devices and then select Extended Tests.

Advanced Testing Checks a particular area of the system. The main system diagnostics screen lists the system's device groups and the system's service tag number.

Information and Results

Displays test result data.

Program Options Sets various test parameters.

Device Configuration

Displays an overview of the devices in the system.

Exit to MS-DOS Exits the diagnostics and returns to the Diagnostics menu.

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Indicators, Codes, and Messages Dell PowerEdge 1750 Systems Service Manual

 The system, applications, and operating systems can identify problems and alert you to them. Any of the following can indicate when the system is not operating properly:

l  System indicators

l  System messages

l  Beep codes

l  Warning messages

l  Diagnostics messages

l  Alert messages

 This section describes each type of message, lists the possible causes, and provides steps to resolve any problems indicated by a message. The system indicators and features are illustrated in this section.

Indicators on the Optional Bezel

 The optional system bezel incorporates a system status indicator divided into blue and amber system status indicators. See Figure 3-1. The blue indicator lights up when the system is operating correctly. The amber caution indicator lights up when the system needs attention due to a problem with power supplies, fans, system temperature, system memory, or hard drives.

 Table 3-1 lists the system's indicator patterns. Different patterns are displayed as events occur in the system.

Figure 3-1.  System Status Indicators 

Table 3-1.  System Status Indicator Patterns  

  Indicators on the Optional Bezel

  Front-Panel Features

  Back-Panel Features

  Power-Supply Features

  System Messages

  System Beep Codes

  System Board LED Codes

  Warning Messages

  Diagnostics Messages

  Alert Messages

Blue Indicator Amber Caution Indicator Description

Off Off Power is not available to the system, or power is available to the system, but the system is not powered on.

Off Blinking The system has detected an error.

On Off Power is on, and the system is operational.

Blinking Off The indicator has been activated to identify the system in a rack.

 NOTE: While the system is being identified, the blue indicator blinks even though an error has been detected. After the system is identified, the blue indicator stops blinking and the amber indicator resumes blinking.

Front-Panel Features

 Figure 3-2 shows the controls, indicators, and connectors located behind the optional bezel on the system's front panel. Table 3-2 provides a description of each feature.

Figure 3-2.  Front-Panel Features

Table 3-2.  Front-Panel LED Indicators, Buttons, and Connectors 

Indicator, Button, or Connector

Icon Description

Blue system status indicator

The blue system status indicator lights up during normal system operation. Both the systems management software and the identification buttons located on the front and back of the system can cause the blue system status indicator to flash to identify a particular system.

Amber system status indicator

The amber system status indicator flashes when the system needs attention. Check for a problem with the power supplies, fans, system temperature, or hard drives.

NOTE: If the system is connected to AC power and an error has been detected, the amber system status indicator flashes regardless of whether the system has been powered on.

NIC1 and NIC2 link and activity indicators

The link and activity indicators for the two integrated NICs light intermittently when the NICs are in use.

Hard-drive activity indicator

The green hard-drive activity indicator flashes when the hard drives are in use. See Figure 3-3 for more information on hard-drive indicators.

Power-on indicator, power button

The power-on indicator lights when the system power is on.

The power button controls the DC power supply output to the system.

 NOTE: If you turn off the system using the power button and the system is running an ACPI-compliant operating system, the system performs a graceful shutdown before the power is turned off. If the system is not running an ACPI-compliant operating system, the power is turned off immediately after the power button is pressed.

Identification button  

The identification buttons on the front and back panels can be used to locate a particular system within a rack. When one of these buttons is pushed, the blue system status indicator on the front and back blinks until one of the buttons is pushed again.

USB connector  

Connects a USB 1.1-compliant device to the system.

Video connector   Connects a monitor to the system.

SCSI Hard-Drive Indicator Codes

 If the optional ROMB card is activated, two indicators on each of the hard-drive carriers provide information about the status of the hard drives. See Figure 3-3 and Table 3-3. The SCSI backplane firmware controls the drive power-on/fault indicator.

Figure 3-3.  SCSI Hard-Drive Indicators

 Table 3-3 lists the drive indicator patterns. Different patterns are displayed as drive events occur in the system. For example, if a hard drive fails, the "drive failed" pattern appears. After the drive is selected for removal, the "drive being prepared for removal" pattern appears, followed by the "drive ready for insertion or removal" pattern. After the replacement drive is installed, the "drive being prepared for operation" pattern appears, followed by the "drive online" pattern.

Table 3-3.  SCSI Hard-Drive Indicator Patterns  

Back-Panel Features

 Figure 3-4 shows the controls, indicators, connectors, and expansion slots located on the system's back panel.

l  For information about the connectors, see "System Board Connectors" in "Jumpers and Connectors."

l  The blue and amber system status indicator combines the functions of the separate blue and amber system status indicators on the front panel. For more information, see Table 3-2.

l  For information about the identification buttons located on the front and back of the system, see "Front-Panel Features."

l  For PCI card information, see "Expansion Cards."

Figure 3-4.  Back-Panel Features and Indicators

NOTE: If the optional ROMB card is not installed, only the "drive online" indicator pattern appears. The drive-activity indicator also blinks when the drive is being accessed.

Condition Indicator Pattern

Identify drive The green power-on/fault indicator blinks four times per second.

Drive being prepared for removal The green power-on/fault indicator blinks two times per second.

Drive ready for insertion or removal Both drive indicators are off.

Drive being prepared for operation The green power-on/fault indicator is on.

Drive predicted failure The power-on/fault indicator slowly blinks green, amber, and off.

Drive failed The amber power-on/fault indicator blinks four times per second.

Drive rebuilding The green power-on/fault indicator blinks slowly.

Drive online The green power-on/fault indicator is on.

NOTE: Connect the power cable to connector PS1 if your system only has one power supply. See Figure 3-4.

Power-Supply Features

 Each hot-pluggable power supply has three indicators, visible when the system covers are open, that indicate whether power is present or whether a power fault has occurred. See Figure 3-5 and Table 3-4 for more information about the indicators. See "System Covers" for information about accessing the inside of the system.

Figure 3-5.  Power-Supply Features

Table 3-4.  Power-Supply Indicator Patterns  

System Messages

 System messages alert you to a possible operating system problem or to a conflict between the software and hardware. Table 3-5 lists the system error messages that can occur and the probable cause for each message.

Indicator Indicator Code

Line status Green indicates that a valid power source is connected to the system.

Power-supply fault Red indicates a problem with the power supply.

Power-supply status Green indicates that the power supply is operational.

NOTE: If you receive a system message that is not listed in Table 3-5, check the documentation for the application that is running when the message appears or the operating system's documentation for an explanation of the message and recommended action.

Table 3-5.  System Messages 

Message Causes Corrective Actions

 Address mark not found Faulty diskette/CD drive subsystem or hard-drive subsystem (defective system board).

Replace the system board. See "System Board."

 Amount of available memory limited to 256 MB! OS Install Mode is enabled in the System Setup program.

Disable the OS Install Mode. See "Using the System Setup Program."

 Alert! One or more of the memory DIMMs are out of rev.

One or more of the installed DIMMs are not supported by the system. DIMMs must be registered DDR SDRAM rated for 266-MHz operation.

Ensure that all installed memory meets the system specifications. See "Memory."

 Alert! Redundant memory disabled! Memory configuration does not support redundant memory.

One memory bank is not populated, or memory banks are different sizes. To support redundant memory, both banks must be populated, and all four DIMMs must be the same size.

Install identical DIMMs in all four memory banks. See "Memory."

 Alert! Unsupported memory, incomplete sets, or unmatched sets.

 The following memory DIMM(s) have been disabled: DIMM_xx

DIMMs are installed in a mismatched pair, or one memory slot in a bank is empty. Memory must be installed in matched pairs. In a mismatched memory bank, neither DIMM is used.

Ensure that memory is installed in matched pairs. See "Memory."

 Auxiliary device failure Mouse or keyboard cable connector loose or improperly connected; defective mouse or keyboard.

Check the mouse and keyboard cable connections. See "External Visual Inspection."

 Attachment failed to respond. Diskette drive or hard-drive controller cannot send data to associated drive.

Reseat drives and check the interface connections to the SCSI backplane. Reboot the system. If you receive an error message from the SCSI, RAID, or diskette controller, replace the diskette drive or hard drive. See "Internal SCSI Hard Drives" or "Installing a Diskette Drive."

 Bad error-correction code (ECC) on disk read. Controller has failed.

Faulty diskette drive, tape drive, or hard- drive subsystem (defective backplane board).

Replace the system board. See "System Board."

 BIOS Update Attempt Failed! Remote BIOS update attempt failed. Retry the BIOS update.

 Caution! NVRAM_CLR jumper is installed on system board - please run SETUP program.

NVRAM_CLR jumper is installed. Remove the NVRAM_CLR jumper. See Figure 5-2 for jumper location.

 CPUs with different cache sizes detected. Two different types of microprocessors are installed.

Install a correct version of the microprocessor so that both microprocessors have the same level 2 cache size. See "Microprocessors."

 Data error Faulty diskette, diskette drive, or hard drive.

Replace the diskette. Reseat all drives, check cable connections, and reboot the system. If the problem persists, replace the diskette drive or hard drive. See "Installing a Diskette Drive" or "Internal SCSI Hard Drives."

 Decreasing available memory One or more memory modules improperly seated or faulty.

Remove and reseat the memory modules. See "Memory." If the problem persists, replace the memory modules.

 Diskette drive 0 seek failure

 Diskette drive 1 seek failure

Faulty or improperly inserted diskette or incorrect configuration settings in System Setup program.

Reseat the diskette drive and replace the diskette. See "Installing a Diskette Drive" Run the System Setup program to correct the diskette drive type. See "Using the System Setup Program." If the problem persists, replace the diskette drive.

 Diskette read failure Faulty diskette, or faulty or improperly connected diskette drive.

Reseat the diskette drive and replace the diskette. See "Installing a Diskette Drive."

 Diskette subsystem reset failed Faulty diskette/CD drive controller (defective system board).

Replace the system board. See "System Board."

 Diskette write protected Diskette write-protect feature is enabled. Disable the write-protect feature on the diskette.

 Drive not ready Diskette missing from or improperly inserted into the diskette drive.

Reinsert the diskette into the drive.

 ECC memory error Improperly seated or faulty memory modules.

Remove and reseat the memory modules. See "Memory." If the problem persists, replace the memory modules.

 Embedded server management error

 Embedded server management is not present

Embedded server management memory may be temporarily corrupted.

To clear the embedded server management memory, shut down the system, disconnect the power cord(s), wait approximately 30 seconds, and then reconnect the power cord(s) and restart the system. If the problem persists, replace the system board. See "System Board."

 Error: Dell Remote Access Controller initialization failure

Defective RAC or system board. Replace the RAC. See the RAC documentation. If the problem persists, replace the system board. See "System Board."

 Gate A20 failure Faulty keyboard controller (defective system board).

Replace the system board. See "System Board."

 General failure Application program or operating system failure.

Reboot. If the message reappears, see your software documentation.

 Hard disk controller failure

 Hard disk read failure

Incorrect configuration settings in the System Setup program, improperly connected hard drive, or faulty hard-drive controller subsystem (defective system board).

Check the hard-drive configuration settings in the System Setup program. See "Using the System Setup Program." Reinstall the hard drive. See "Internal SCSI Hard Drives" or "External SCSI Hard Drives." If the problem persists, replace the system board. See "System Board."

 Invalid configuration information - please run SETUP program.

Invalid configuration settings in the System Setup program, or the system battery is faulty.

Check the System Setup configuration settings. See "Using the System Setup Program." Replace the battery. See "System Battery."

 Invalid memory configuration detected. Potential for data corruption exists!

Memory modules are not installed in matched pairs.

Install memory modules in matched pairs. See "Memory."

 Invalid NVRAM configuration, resource re- allocated

System configuration data has been ignored.

Check the System Setup configuration settings. See "Using the System Setup Program."

 I/O card parity interrupt at address Expansion card(s) is improperly installed or faulty.

Reinstall the expansion card(s). See "Expansion Cards." If the problem persists, replace the expansion card(s).

 Keyboard controller failure Defective keyboard/mouse controller (defective system board).

Replace the system board. See "System Board."

 Keyboard data line failure

 Keyboard stuck key failure

 Keyboard clock line failure

 Keyboard failure

Keyboard cable connector is loose or improperly connected; defective keyboard; defective keyboard/mouse controller (defective system board).

Check the keyboard cable connection. Replace the keyboard. If the problem persists, replace the system board. See "System Board."

 Memory allocation error Memory module(s) is not connected properly, or an application program or the operating system failed.

Reseat the modules. See "Memory." Reboot the system. If the message reappears, see your software documentation.

 Memory address line failure at address, read value expecting value

 Memory high data line failure at start address to end address

 Memory high address line failure at start address to end address

 Memory double word logic failure at start address to end address

 Memory double word logic failure at address, read value expecting value

 Memory odd/even logic failure at start address to end address

 Memory odd/even logic failure at address, read value expecting value

 Memory write/read failure at address, read value expecting value

 Memory write/read failure at start address to end address

Faulty or improperly seated memory modules or defective system board.

Remove and reseat the memory modules. See "Memory." If the problem persists, replace the memory modules. If the problem persists, replace the system board. See "System Board."

 Memory parity failure at start address to end address

 Memory parity error at address

Improperly seated or faulty memory modules.

Remove and reseat the memory modules. See "Memory." If the problem persists, replace the memory modules.

 No boot device available Faulty diskette, diskette/CD drive subsystem, hard drive, or hard-drive subsystem; no boot disk in drive A.

Replace the diskette. Replace the diskette drive or the hard drive. See "Installing a Diskette Drive" or "Internal SCSI Hard Drives." If the problem persists, replace the system board. See "System Board."

 No boot sector on hard- disk No operating system on the hard drive. Check the hard-drive configuration settings in the System Setup program. See "Using the System Setup Program."

 No timer tick interrupt Defective system board. Replace the system board. See "System Board."

 No PXE-capable device available was pressed during POST and no PXE devices are detected.

Check the cables connected to the NICs. Check the configuration settings in the System Setup program for the NICs. See "Using the System Setup Program."

 Non-system disk or disk error Faulty diskette, diskette drive subsystem, or hard-drive subsystem.

Replace the diskette. Reseat all drives and reboot the system. If the error message reappears, replace the system board. See "System Board."

 Not a boot diskette No operating system on diskette. Use a bootable diskette.

 PCI BIOS failed to install PCI device (option ROM) checksum failure is detected during shadowing.

Contact the PCI device manufacturer to obtain a suitable replacement PCI option ROM. Follow the manufacturer's instructions to install the option ROM.

 Plug & Play Configuration Error Error encountered when initializing the PCI device, or the system board is defective.

Install the NVRAM_CLR jumper and reboot the system. See Figure 5-2 for jumper location. If the problem persists, replace the system board. See "System Board."

 Plug & Play Configuration Error PCI_n Error encountered when initializing the PCI adapter.

Install the NVRAM_CLR jumper and reboot the system. See Figure 5-2 for jumper location. If the problem persists, replace the specified expansion card. See "Expansion Cards." If the problem persists, replace the system board. See "System Board."

 Primary backplane error Improperly attached or missing backplane.

Ensure that the SCSI backplane board is fully seated. See "SCSI Backplane Board."

 Primary IDE device 0 not found

 Primary IDE device 1 not found

Improperly connected or missing IDE device.

Ensure that the device's interface cable is securely connected to the SCSI backplane board. See "Installing a Diskette Drive" or "Installing a CD Drive." If the problem persists, replace the device.

 Processor 1 internal error

 Processor 2 internal error

Defective microprocessor or system board (reported by the NMI handler).

Replace the specified microprocessor. See "Microprocessors." If the problem persists, replace the system board. See "System Board."

 Processor 1 is a 533-MHz system bus processor

 Processor 2 is a 533-MHz system bus processor

Two 533-MHz microprocessors are installed. This system supports only Intel Xeon 400-MHz front-side-bus processors.

Reboot the system. If you receive beep code 4-4-3 (processor frequency mismatch), replace both processors with Intel Xeon 400-MHz front-side-bus processors. See "Microprocessors."

If a beep code does not occur at system boot, turn off the system, install the NVRAM_CLR jumper, and reboot the system. See Figure 5-2 for jumper location.

 Processor bus error

 PCI bus error

 IMB bus error

Defective system board (reported by the NMI handler).

Replace the system board. See "System Board."

 Processor x is not a 533-MHz system bus processor

 This system bus speed is not supported on this system board

This system supports only Intel Xeon 533- MHz front-side bus (system bus) processors.

Reboot the system. If you receive beep code 4-4-3 (processor frequency mismatch), replace processor x with a supported processor. See "Microprocessors."

If a beep code does not occur at system boot, turn off the system, install the NVRAM_CLR jumper, and reboot the system. See Figure 5-2 for jumper location.

 Read fault

 Requested sector not found

Faulty diskette, diskette-drive subsystem, or hard-drive subsystem.

Replace the diskette. Reseat all drives and reboot the system. If the message reappears, replace the diskette drive. See "Installing a Diskette Drive." If the problem persists, replace the system board. See "System Board."

 Reset failed Improperly connected diskette/tape drive, hard drive, or power cable.

Check the drive and cable connections, and reset the system again.

 ROM bad checksum = address Expansion card improperly installed or faulty.

Reinstall the expansion card. See "Expansion Cards." If the problem persists, replace the expansion card.

 Sector not found

 Seek error

 Seek operation failed

Defective sectors on diskette or hard drive.

Faulty diskette, diskette-drive subsystem, or hard-drive subsystem.

Replace the diskette, or reseat all drives and reboot the system. See "Installing a Diskette Drive" or "Internal SCSI Hard Drives." If the message reappears, replace the drive (s). If the problem persists, replace the system board. See "System Board."

 Shutdown failure Defective system board. Replace the system board. See "System Board."

 System backplane error Improperly attached or missing SCSI backplane.

Reseat the SCSI backplane. See "SCSI Backplane Board."

 System halted! Must power down. Wrong password entered too many times.

Reboot the system and enter the correct password. If the problem persists, see "Disabling a Forgotten Password."

 System parity error Defective expansion card(s) or improperly seated or faulty memory modules (reported by the NMI handler).

Replace the expansion cards one at a time until the error is corrected. See "Expansion Cards."

Remove and reseat the memory modules. See "Memory." If the problem persists, replace the memory modules. If the problem persists, replace the system board. See "System Board."

 The following memory DIMMs are unsupported: DIMM_xx.

 This system only supports 266 MHz DIMMs.

One or more of the installed DIMMs has a frequency less than 266 MHz. System memory must be rated for 266 MHz. 

Replace lower-speed DIMM(s) with modules rated for 266- MHz operation. See "Memory."

 This processor system bus speed is unknown.

 System halted!

The installed microprocessor is not supported by the system.

Reboot the system. If you receive beep code 4-4-3 (processor frequency mismatch), replace the installed microprocessor(s) with microprocessor(s) supported by your system. See "Microprocessors."

If a beep code does not occur at system boot, turn off the system, install the NVRAM_CLR jumper, and reboot the system. See Figure 5-2 for jumper location.

 This system only supports 400-MHz system bus speed.

 System halted!

Two 533-MHz microprocessors are installed. This system supports only Intel Xeon 400-MHz front-side-bus processors.

Reboot the system. If you receive beep code 4-4-3 (processor frequency mismatch), replace both processors with Intel Xeon 400-MHz front-side-bus processors. See "Microprocessors."

If a beep code does not occur at system boot, turn off the system, install the NVRAM_CLR jumper, and reboot the system. See Figure 5-2 for jumper location.

 Time-of-day clock stopped Defective battery or faulty chip (defective system board).

Replace the system battery. See "System Battery." If the problem persists, replace the system board. See "System Board."

 Time-of-day not set - please run SETUP program Incorrect Time or Date settings or defective system battery.

Check the Time and Date settings. See "Using the System Setup Program." If the problem persists, replace the system battery. See "System Battery." If the problem persists, replace the system board. See "System Board."

 Timer chip counter 2 failed Defective system board. Replace the system board. See "System Board."

 Unsupported CPU combination Microprocessor combination is not supported by the system.

Install a supported microprocessor combination. See "Microprocessors."

 Unsupported CPU stepping detected. Microprocessor is not supported by the system.

Install the correct version of the microprocessor in the specified microprocessor socket. See "Microprocessors."

 Utility partition not available key was pressed during POST, but Create a utility partition on the boot hard drive. See

System Beep Codes

 When an error that cannot be reported on the monitor occurs during a boot routine, the system may emit a series of beeps that identify the problem.

 When a beep code is emitted, record it on a copy of the Diagnostics Checklist (located in "Getting Help" in the Installation and Troubleshooting Guide), and then look it up in Table 3-6. If you are unable to resolve the problem by looking up the meaning of the beep code, use the system diagnostics to identify a more serious cause.

Table 3-6.  System Beep Codes 

no utility partition exists on the boot hard drive.

"Using the Dell OpenManage Server Assistant CD" in your User's Guide.

 Warning: Detected mode change from SCSI to RAID on channel x of the embedded RAID subsystem.

 Warning: Detected missing RAID hardware for the embedded RAID subsystem. Data loss will occur!

Press Y to switch mode to SCSI, press any other

key to disable both channels. Press Y to confirm

the change; press any other key to cancel.

Type of controller has changed since previous system boot.

Back up information on the hard drives before changing the type of controller used with the drives.

 Warning: Detected mode change from RAID to SCSI on channel x of the embedded RAID subsystem.

 Warning: Detected missing RAID hardware for the embedded RAID subsystem. Data loss will occur!

Press Y to switch mode to SCSI, press any other

key to disable both channels. Press Y to confirm

the change; press any other key to cancel.

Type of controller has changed since previous system boot.

Back up information on the hard drives before changing the type of controller used with the drives.

 Warning! Embedded SCSI- RAID error Faulty RAID adapter, or ROMB card firmware is either corrupted or is the wrong version.

Reseat the ROMB card. See "ROMB Card." If the message reappears, replace the ROMB card.

 Warning! Embedded SCSI- RAID firmware is not present!

ROMB card firmware is either corrupted or is the wrong version.

Reseat the ROMB card. See "ROMB Card." Reboot the system. If the message reappears, replace the ROMB card."

 Warning! Firmware is out- of-date, please update

Out-of-date firmware. Update the system firmware. See "Using the Dell OpenManage Server Assistant CD" in your User's Guide for information about updating the system firmware.

 Warning! No microcode update loaded for processor x

BIOS is not current. Update the BIOS, but do not turn the system off before the update. See "Using the System Setup Program."

 Warning! Remote Access Controller command failure

Command protocol failure between the RAC and ESM3.

Reseat the RAC in its system board connector. See "Opening the System Covers," and then see Figure 5-3 for the location of the RAC Ethernet connector. If the message reappears, replace the RAC. If the problem persists, replace the system board. See "System Board."

 Warning! Unsupported Remote Access Controller firmware version detected

RAC firmware is corrupted or is the wrong version.

Reseat the RAC in its system board connector. See "Opening the System Covers," and then see Figure 5-3 for the location of the RAC Ethernet connector. If the message reappears, replace the RAC.

 Write fault

 Write fault on selected drive

Faulty diskette or hard drive. Replace the diskette. If the problem persists, replace the diskette drive. See "Installing a Diskette Drive." If the problem persists, replace the hard drive. See "Internal SCSI Hard Drives."

NOTE: If the system boots without a keyboard, mouse, or monitor attached, the system will not issue beep codes related to these peripherals.

Code Cause Corrective Action

1-1-2 Microprocessor register test failure Replace microprocessor 1. See "Microprocessors." If the problem persists, replace microprocessor 2.

1-1-3 CMOS write/read failure Replace the system board. See "System Board."

1-1-4 BIOS checksum failure This fatal error usually requires replacement of the BIOS firmware. Reflash the BIOS firmware.

1-2-1 Programmable interval-timer failure Replace the system board. See "System Board."

1-2-2 1-2-3

DMA initialization failure DMA page register write/read failure

Remove and reseat the memory modules. See "Memory." If the problem persists, replace the memory modules. If the problem persists, replace the system board. See "System Board."

1-3-1 Main-memory refresh verification failure

1-3-2 No memory installed

1-3-3 Chip or data line failure in the first 64 KB of main  memory

1-3-4 Odd/even logic failure in the first 64 KB of main  memory

1-4-1 Address line failure in the first 64 KB of main  memory

1-4-2 Parity failure in the first 64 KB of main memory

System Board LED Codes

 The system board LEDs are visible only when the covers are open. Table 3-7 lists the system board LED codes and their meanings.

Table 3-7.  System Board LED Codes  

Warning Messages

2-1-1 through 2-4-4

Bit failure in the first 64 KB of main memory

3-1-1   Slave DMA-register failure Replace the system board. See "System Board."

3-1-2 Master DMA-register failure

3-1-3 Master interrupt-mask register failure

3-1-4 Slave interrupt-mask register failure

3-2-4 Keyboard-controller test failure Check the keyboard cable and connector for proper connection. If the problem persists, replace the keyboard. If the problem persists, replace the system board. See "System Board."

3-3-1 CMOS failure Replace the system board. See "System Board."

3-3-2 System configuration check failure

3-3-3 Keyboard controller not detected

3-3-4  Screen initialization failure

3-4-2 Screen-retrace test failure

3-4-3 Search for video ROM failure

4-2-1 No timer tick

4-2-2 Shutdown failure

4-2-3 Gate A20 failure

4-2-4 Unexpected interrupt in protected mode Ensure that all expansion cards are properly seated, and then reboot the system. See "Expansion Cards."

4-3-1 Improperly seated or faulty memory modules Remove and reseat the memory modules. See "Memory." If the problem persists, replace the memory modules. If the problem persists, replace the system board. See "System Board."

4-3-3 Defective system board Replace the system board. See "System Board."

4-3-4 Time-of-day clock stopped Replace the battery. See "System Battery." If the problem persists, replace the system board. See "System Board."

4-4-1 Super I/O chip failure (defective system board) Replace the system board. See "System Board."

4-4-3 Microprocessor frequency mismatch. Occurs when the front-side (external) bus speed of a microprocessor is not supported.

If video is available, a screen message identifies the faulty microprocessor. Replace the microprocessor with a supported microprocessor. See "Microprocessors." If video is not available, replace microprocessor 1 and then, if the problem persists, replace microprocessor 2.

4-4-4 Cache test failure (defective microprocessor) Remove and reseat the microprocessor(s). See "Microprocessors." If the problem persists, replace the microprocessor(s). If the problem persists, replace the system board. See "System Board."

LED Indicator Normal Operation Error Condition

FANn_LED

(Located by each fan.)

Green Blinking amber: A problem exists with the associated fan.

THERMTRIP

(Located near the front left corner of the system board.)

Off Amber: One or both of the processors are overheated.

MISMATCH

(Located near the front left corner of the system board.)

Off Amber: Processors do not match.

VRM1_OK

(Located near the edge of the system board by VRM1.)

Green Off: Processor 1 VRM is disabled.

VRM2_OK

(Located near the edge of the system board by VRM2.)

Green if two processors are installed or off if only one processor is installed.

Off if two processors are installed.

D_12V

(Located near the front left corner of the system board, near the PS_PWR connector.)

Green Off: System 12-V power is not available.

D_3VAUX

(Located near the front left corner of the system board, near the PS_PWR connector.)

Green System 3.3-V auxiliary power is not available.

 A warning message alerts you to a possible problem and asks you to take corrective action before the system continues a task. For example, before you format a diskette, a message may warn you that you may lose all data on the diskette, as a way to protect against inadvertently erasing or writing over the data. These warning messages usually interrupt the procedure and require you to respond by typing y (yes) or n (no).

Diagnostics Messages

 When you run system diagnostics, an error message may result. Diagnostic error messages are not covered in this section. Record the message on a copy of the Diagnostics Checklist (located in "Getting Help" in the Installation and Troubleshooting Guide), and then follow the instructions in that section for obtaining technical assistance.

Alert Messages

 Systems management software generates alert messages for your system. Alert messages include information, status, warning, and failure messages for drive, temperature, fan, and power conditions. For more information, see the systems management software documentation.

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NOTE: Warning messages are generated by either the application program or the operating system. See "Finding Software Solutions" in the Installation and Troubleshooting Guide and the documentation that accompanied the operating system or application program for further information.

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Jumpers and Connectors Dell PowerEdge 1750 Systems Service Manual

  JumpersA General Explanation

  System Board Jumpers

  System Board Connectors

  SCSI Backplane Board Connectors

  PCI Card Connectors

 This section provides specific information about the jumpers on the system board. It also provides some basic information on jumpers and switches and describes the connectors and sockets on the various boards in the system.

JumpersA General Explanation

 Jumpers provide a convenient and reversible way of reconfiguring the circuitry on a printed circuit board. When reconfiguring the system, you may need to change jumper settings on the system board. You may also need to change jumper settings on expansion cards or drives.

Jumpers

 Jumpers are small blocks on a circuit board with two or more pins emerging from them. Plastic plugs containing a wire fit down over the pins. The wire connects the pins and creates a circuit. To change a jumper setting, pull the plug off its pin(s) and carefully fit it down onto the pin(s) indicated. Figure 5-1 shows an example of a jumper.

Figure 5-1. Example Jumper

 A jumper is referred to as open or unjumpered when the plug is pushed down over only one pin or if there is no plug at all. When the plug is pushed down over two pins, the jumper is referred to as jumpered. The jumper setting is often shown in text as two numbers, such as 1-2. The number 1 is printed on the circuit board so that you can identify each pin number based on the location of pin 1.

System Board Jumpers

 Figure 5-2 shows the location and default settings of the jumper blocks on the system board. See Table 5-1 for the designations, default settings, and functions of the system's jumpers.

Figure 5-2. System Board Jumpers

CAUTION: Make sure the system is turned off before you change a jumper setting. Otherwise, damage to the system or unpredictable results may occur.

Table 5-1. System Board Jumper Settings  

System Board Connectors

 See Figure 5-3 and Table 5-2 for the descriptions and locations of the system board connectors.

Figure 5-3. System Board Connectors and Sockets

Table 5-2. System Board Connectors and Sockets 

Jumper Setting Description

 RSVD_FVS     Reserved (do not change).

 PASSWD

 (default)  The password feature is enabled. The password feature is disabled.

 NVRAM_CLR

 (default)  The configuration settings are retained at system boot. The configuration settings are cleared at next system boot. (If the configuration settings become corrupted to the point where the system will not boot, install the jumper plug and boot the system. Remove the jumper before restoring the configuration information.)

 jumpered   unjumpered

Connector or Socket Description

BACKPLANE SCSI backplane board connector

B1 System battery connector

CYCLOPS Cable-management arm system status connector

DIMM_1x; DIMM_2x Memory module sockets

EMBEDDED_REMOTE_ ASSISTANT

Connector for optional RAC

EMP_NIC RAC Ethernet port connector

ETHERNET_n NIC connectors (2)

 NOTE: If you purchased a 400-MHz front-side bus system with a preinstalled Gigabit PCI network card, the integrated NIC connectors are nonfunctional.

FANn Cooling fan power connectors (six on system board; one on control panel assembly)

FRONT_PANEL System control panel connector

KYBD Keyboard connectors

MOUSE Mouse connector

PCIn PCI riser board connector

PROCESSOR 1 Microprocessor socket 1

SCSI Backplane Board Connectors

 Figure 5-4 shows the location of the connectors on the top of the SCSI backplane board.

Figure 5-4. Connectors on the SCSI Backplane Board

PCI Card Connectors

 Figure 5-5 identifies the two PCI-X card connectors on the PCI riser board assembly.

Figure 5-5. Riser-Board Expansion-Card Connectors

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PROCESSOR 2 Microprocessor socket 2

PS_PWR System board power connector

PS_SIG Power supply signal connector

RAID Socket for optional ROMB card

RAID BAT Backup battery connector for ROMB card

SCSI_B External SCSI connector

SERIAL Serial port connector

USBn USB connector

VGA VGA connector

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System Overview Dell PowerEdge 1750 Systems Service Manual

  System Features

  Service Features

  Supported Operating Systems

  Software Features

  Power Protection Devices

  Other Documents You May Need

  Technical Specifications

System Features

 The system offers the following features:

l  One or two Intel Xeon microprocessors with an internal operating speed of at least 1.8 GHz for the 400-MHz processor and 2.4 GHz for the 533-MHz processor, a level 2 cache of 512 KB, and a front-side bus operating at 400 or 533 MHz.

l  Support for symmetric multiprocessing (SMP), which is available on systems with two Intel Xeon microprocessors. SMP greatly improves overall system performance by dividing microprocessor operations between independent microprocessors. To take advantage of this feature, you must use an operating system that supports multiprocessing.

l  A minimum of 256 MB of PC-266 registered DDR SDRAM memory modules, upgradable to a maximum of 8 GB by installing combinations of 128-MB, 256- MB, 512-MB, 1-GB, or 2-GB 2-way interleaving memory modules in the four memory module sockets on the system board.

l  Support for up to three 1-inch, internal U320 SCSI hard drives (with hot-plug capability when using the optional ROMB card).

l  A single, 1.44-MB, 3.5-inch diskette drive.

l  An IDE CD or DVD drive.

l  Up to two hot-pluggable, 320-W power supplies in a 1 + 1 redundant configuration.

l  Seven hot-pluggable system cooling fans.

 The system board includes the following features:

l  A riser board assembly that supports up to two PCI expansion cards (two 3.3-V, 64-bit, 133-MHz PCI-X cards or one 3.3-V, 64-bit, 133-MHz PCI-X card and one 5-V, 64-bit, 33-MHz PCI card)

l  An integrated VGA-compatible video subsystem with an ATI RAGE XL video controller. This video subsystem contains 8 MB of SDRAM video memory (nonupgradable). Maximum resolution is 1600 x 1200 with 64,000 colors; 32-bit color depth is available for true-color graphics in the following resolutions: 640 x 480, 800 x 600, 1024 x 768, and 1280 x 1024. See the operating system documentation for additional supported video modes.

l  An integrated, dual-channel U320 SCSI host adapter. The internal channel supports up to three SCSI hard drives on the SCSI backplane. The SCSI backplane automatically configures SCSI ID numbers and SCSI termination, greatly simplifying drive installation. The second SCSI channel (an external SCSI channel) is available at the back of the system.

l  Optional ROMB through a separate RAID controller that incorporates 128 MB of cache memory and a RAID battery.

l  A Gigabit Ethernet PCI network card or two integrated Gigabit Ethernet NICs, capable of supporting 10-Mbps, 100-Mbps, and 1000-Mbps data rates.

l  Optional remote access controller (RAC) for remote system management.

l  Back-panel connectors include mouse, keyboard, serial, video, USB, external SCSI, RAC Ethernet, and two integrated NIC connectors.

l  Front-panel connectors include a video and a USB connector.

 For more information about specific features, see "Technical Specifications."

Service Features

 The system includes the following service features to facilitate troubleshooting and repair:

l  Systems management circuitry that monitors operation of the system fans as well as critical system voltages and temperatures. The systems management circuitry works in conjunction with the systems management software.

l  System diagnostics for evaluating system components and devices. For information about using the system diagnostics, see "Running the System Diagnostics."

NOTE: If you decide to upgrade your system by installing a second microprocessor, you must order the microprocessor upgrade kits from Dell. Not all versions of the Intel Xeon microprocessor will work properly as additional microprocessors. The upgrade kit from Dell contains the correct version of the microprocessor as well as the instructions for performing the upgrade. Both microprocessors must have the same internal operating frequency and cache size.

Supported Operating Systems

l  Microsoft Windows 2000 Server and Advanced Server

l  Microsoft Windows Server 2003 Standard Edition, Enterprise Edition, and Web Edition (when available)

l  Red Hat Linux 8.0 and Red Hat Linux Advanced Server 2.1

l  Novell NetWare 6.0

Software Features

 The following software is included with your system:

l  A System Setup program for quickly viewing and changing system configuration information. For more information on this program, see "Using the System Setup Program."

l  Enhanced security features, including a system password and a setup password, available through the System Setup program.

l  Video drivers for displaying many popular application programs in high-resolution modes.

l  SCSI device drivers that allow the operating system to communicate with devices attached to the integrated SCSI subsystem.

l  Systems management software and documentation CDs.

Power Protection Devices

 Certain devices protect your system from the effects of problems such as power surges and power failures.

l  PDU Uses circuit breakers to ensure that the AC current load does not exceed the PDU's rating.

l  Surge protector Prevents voltage spikes, such as those that may occur during an electrical storm, from entering the system through the electrical outlet. They do not protect against brownouts, which occur when the voltage drops more than 20 percent below the normal AC line voltage level.

l  Line conditioner Maintains a system's AC power source voltage at a moderately constant level and provides protection from brownouts, but does not protect against a complete power loss.

l  UPS Uses battery power to keep the system running when AC power is unavailable. The battery is charged by AC power while it is available so that after AC power is lost, the battery can provide power to the system for a limited amount of timefrom 5 minutes to approximately an hour. A UPS that  provides only 5 minutes of battery power allows you to shutdown the system. Use surge protectors and PDUs with all universal power supplies, and ensure that the UPS is UL-safety approved.

Other Documents You May Need

l  The Rack Installation Guide included with your rack solution describes how to install your system into a rack.

l  The Getting Started Guide document provides an overview of initially setting up your system.

l  The User's Guide provides information about system features and technical specifications

l  The Installation and Troubleshooting Guide describes how to troubleshoot the system and install and replace system components.

l  The Dell Remote Access Controller Installation and Setup Guide provides complete information about installing, configuring, and using a RAC to remotely access a system.

l  Systems management software documentation describes the features, requirements, installation, and basic operation of the software.

l  Operating system documentation describes how to install (if necessary), configure, and use the operating system software.

l  The System Administrator's Guide provides system operation and management operation.

l  Documentation for any components you purchased separately provides information to configure and install these options.

l  Updates are sometimes included with the system to describe changes to the system, software, and/or documentation.

l  Release notes or readme files may be included to provide last-minute updates to the system or documentation or advanced technical reference material intended for experienced users or technicians.

Technical Specifications

The System Information Guide provides important safety and regulatory information. Warranty information may be included within this document or as a separate document.

NOTE: Always read the updates first because they often supersede information in other documents.

Microprocessor

Microprocessor type up to two Intel Xeon microprocessors with a minimum internal operating frequency of at least 1.8 GHz for the 400-MHz processor and 2.4 GHz for the 533-MHz processor

Front-side bus speed 100 or 133 MHz

Address bus speed 200 or 266 MHz (doubled address transfer rate)

Data bus speed 400 or 533 MHz (quadrupled data transfer rate)

Internal cache 512 KB or 1 MB level 2 cache

Math coprocessor internal to microprocessor

Expansion Bus

Bus type PCI, PCI-X

Expansion slots two 3.3-V, 64-bit, 133-MHz PCI-X slots

or

one 3.3-V, 64-bit, 133-MHz PCI-X slot and one 5-V 64-bit, 33-MHz PCI slot

Memory

Architecture 72-bit ECC PC-266 registered DDR SDRAM DIMMs, with 2-way interleaving

Memory module sockets four 72-bit wide 168-pin DIMM sockets

Memory module capacities 128-MB, 256-MB, 512-MB, 1-GB, or 2-GB registered DDR SDRAM DIMMs, rated for 266-MHz operation

Minimum RAM 256 MB

Maximum RAM 8 GB

Drives

Hard drives up to three 1-inch, internal U320 SCSI

Diskette drive 3.5-inch, 1.44-MB diskette drive

CD or DVD drive IDE CD or DVD drive

Connectors

Externally accessible:

 Back:

 SCSI 68-pin U320 SCSI connector

 Serial 9-pin connector

 USB 4-pin connectors

 NIC two RJ45 connectors for integrated 10/100/1000- Mbps NICs

 RAC one RJ45 connector for optional RAC (100-Mbps Ethernet controller)

 Video 15-pin connector

 PS/2-style keyboard 6-pin mini-DIN connector

 PS/2-compatible mouse 6-pin mini-DIN connector

 Front:

 Video 15-pin connector

 USB 4-pin connector

Video

Video type ATI Rage XL PCI video controller; VGA connector

Video memory 8 MB

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Power

Power supply:

 Wattage 320 W (AC)

 Voltage 100240 VAC, 50/60 Hz, 3.92.0 A

 Heat dissipation 1026 BTU/hr maximum per power supply

 Maximum inrush current Under typical line conditions and over the entire system ambient operating range, the inrush current may reach 25 A per power supply for 10 ms or less.

System battery 3.0-V lithium ion coin cell

Physical

Height 4.2 cm (1.67 inches)

Width 44.7 cm (17.6 inches)

Depth 68.3 cm (26.9 inches)

Weight (maximum) 15.9 kg (35 lb)

Environmental

Temperature:

 Operating 10 to 35C (50 to 95F)

 Storage 40 to 65C (40 to 149F)

Relative humidity:

 Operating 8% to 85% (noncondensing) with a humidity gradation of 10% per hour

 Storage 5% to 95% (noncondensing)

Maximum vibration:

 Operating 0.25 G at 3 to 200 Hz at 0.5 octaves per minute in the positive z axis

 Storage 0.5 G at 3 to 200 Hz at 0.5 octaves per minute in the positive and negative x, y, and z axes

Maximum shock:

 Operating 1 shock pulse in the positive and negative x, y, and z axis (1 pulse on each side of the system) of 41 G for up to 2 ms

 Storage (non-operational) six consecutively executed shock pulses in the positive and negative x, y, and z axes (one pulse on each side of the system) of 71 G for up to 2 ms

Operational:

 Half sine operational shock 31G @ 2.6 milliseconds in the operating axis (one shock)

Non-operational:

 Non-operational half sine shock 71G @ 2 milliseconds

 Non-operational square wave shock 32G @ 270 inches/sec

Altitude:

 Operating 16 to 3,048 m (50 to 10,000 ft)

 Storage 16 to 10,600 m (50 to 35,000 ft)

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Removing and Replacing System Components Dell PowerEdge 1750 Systems Service Manual

 The procedures in this guide require that you remove the cover and work inside the system. While working inside the system, do not attempt to service the system except as explained in this manual and elsewhere in the system documentation. Always follow the instructions closely and review all of the procedures in "Safety Instructions" in the System Information Guide.

 This section provides servicing procedures for components inside the system. Before you start any of these procedures, perform the following tasks:

l  Perform the procedures described in "External Visual Inspection."

l   Read the safety information in the System Information Guide.

 When a replacement procedure is not provided, use the removal procedure in reverse order to install the replacement part.

Recommended Tools

l  Key to the system keylock

l  #1 and #2 Phillips screwdrivers

l  Wrist grounding strap

Optional Front Bezel

 The optional front bezel has system status indicators. A lock on the bezel restricts access to the power button, diskette drive, CD drive, hard drive(s), and the interior of the system.

Removing the Bezel

 To remove the bezel, use the system key to unlock the keylock on the bezel, press the tab at each end of the bezel, and then pull the bezel away from the system. See Figure 4-1.

Figure 4-1.  Removing and Replacing the Optional Front Bezel 

  Recommended Tools

  Optional Front Bezel

  System Covers

  Inside the System

  Expansion Cards

  Memory

  Microprocessors

  ROMB Card

  Cooling Fans

  Cooling Fan Bracket

  Control Panel

  Removing and Replacing Power Supplies

  Power Distribution Board

  System Battery

  SCSI Backplane Board

  System Board

  Internal SCSI Hard Drives

  External SCSI Hard Drives

  Configuring the Boot Device

  Installing an External SCSI Tape Drive

  Installing a Diskette Drive

  Installing a CD Drive

CAUTION: Only trained service technicians are authorized to open the system covers and access any of the components inside the system. See the System Information Guide for complete information about safety precautions, working inside the system, and protecting against electrostatic discharge.

Replacing the Bezel

 To replace the front bezel, fit the tabs on the bezel into the corresponding slots in the front panel and lock the keylock.

System Covers

 Two covers on the top of the system provide access to the system board and other internal components.

Opening the System Covers

1.  Slide the system out of the rack.

2.  If the front bezel is installed, remove the front bezel. See "Optional Front Bezel."

3.  If the optional security screw is installed on the system cover (see Figure 4-2), remove it now.

Figure 4-2.  Opening the System Covers

4.  Press the latch on the system front panel and lift the left cover.

5.  Lift the right cover.

Closing the System Covers

1.  Close the right (larger) cover first and then close the left cover.

2.  Press firmly on the left cover to snap the securing latch into place.

3.  Replace the optional front bezel, if one was installed. See "Replacing the Bezel."

CAUTION: Only trained service technicians are authorized to open the system covers and access any of the components inside the system. See the System Information Guide for complete information about safety precautions, working inside the system, and protecting against electrostatic discharge.

Inside the System

 In Figure 4-3, the system covers are open and the bezel is removed to provide an interior view of the system.

Figure 4-3.  Inside the System 

 The system board can accommodate one or two microprocessors. The PCI riser board assembly accommodates up to two PCI expansion cards. Up to four memory modules may be installed on the system board.

 The hard-drive bays provide space for up to three 1-inch SCSI hard drives. SCSI hard drives are connected to a SCSI controller on the system board through the SCSI backplane board.

 The peripheral bays provide space for an optional 3.5-inch diskette drive and a CD drive.

 The power distribution board (PDB) provides hot-plug logic and power distribution for the system. Two hot-pluggable, redundant power supplies provide power to the system board and internal peripherals.

 During an installation or troubleshooting procedure, you may be required to change a jumper. For information about the system board jumpers, see "Jumpers and Connectors."

Expansion Cards

 Up to two half-length, PCI-X expansion cards can be installed in the system, one on each side of the riser board assembly. See Figure 4-4. The riser board assembly consists of two riser boards permanently attached to each other with plastic standoffs. It plugs into twin riser connectors on the system board and is considered an extension of the system board. See Figure 5-3.

 The PCI slot locations are marked on the system board as PCI 1 and PCI 2. The PCI 1 connector on the riser board assembly is higher than the PCI 2  connector, because the PCI 1 card installs above the optional ROMB card. 

 Two different PCI card configurations are available:

l  Two PCI-X, 64-bit, 133-MHz, 3.3-V expansion cards

l  One PCI-X, 64-bit, 133-MHz, 3.3-V expansion card in PCI 2, and one PCI, 64-bit, 33-MHz, 5-V expansion card in PCI 1.

Figure 4-4.  Riser-Board Expansion-Card Connectors

NOTICE: If you purchased a system with redundant power supplies, you must connect both power cables to the system; otherwise, the fans operate at the maximum RPM, which increases the fan noise. To ensure redundancy, connect the power cables to two different electrical power sources.

Installing an Expansion Card

1.  Remove the optional front bezel, if present. See "Removing the Bezel."

2.  Turn off the system, including any attached peripherals, and disconnect the system from its electrical outlet.

3.  Prepare the expansion card for installation.

 See the documentation that came with the expansion card for information about configuring the card, making internal connections, or otherwise customizing the card for your system.

4.  Open the system covers. See "Opening the System Covers."

5.  Remove the filler bracket from the expansion slot.

Figure 4-5.  Installing an Expansion Card 

6.  Slide the plastic expansion-card latch in the chassis wall up to the release position, and pivot it back to allow card insertion.

7.  Insert the card-edge connector firmly into the expansion-card connector on the riser board.

8.  Press in until the card is fully seated, ensuring that the card's filler bracket also fits correctly into the expansion-slot opening. See Figure 4-5.

9.  When the card is seated in the connector, pivot the expansion-card latch back and press it down firmly.

10.  Connect any cables that should be attached to the card.

 See the documentation supplied with the card for information about its cable connections.

11.  Close the system covers. See "Closing the System Covers."

12.  Reconnect the system and peripherals to their electrical outlets, and turn them on.

13.  Replace the optional front bezel, if applicable. See "Replacing the Bezel."

Removing an Expansion Card

1.  Remove the optional front bezel, if present. See "Removing the Bezel."

2.  Turn off the system, including any attached peripherals, and disconnect the system from its electrical outlet.

3.  Open the system covers. See "Opening the System Covers."

4.  Disconnect any cables connected to the card.

5.  Slide the plastic expansion-card latch in the chassis wall up to the release position. See Figure 4-5. Pivot the latch back to allow for card removal.

CAUTION: Before you perform the following procedure, you must turn off the system and disconnect it from its power source. See the System Information Guide for complete information about safety precautions, working inside the system, and protecting against electrostatic discharge.

CAUTION: Before you perform this procedure, you must turn off the system and disconnect it from its power source. See the System Information Guide for complete information about safety precautions, working inside the system, and protecting against electrostatic discharge.

6.  Grasp the expansion card by its edges, and remove it from the expansion-card connector.

7.  If you are removing the card permanently, install a metal filler bracket over the empty card-slot opening.

8.  Pivot the expansion-card latch back into position and press it down firmly.

9.  Close the system covers. See "Closing the System Covers."

10.  Reconnect the system and peripherals to their electrical outlets, and turn them on.

11.  Replace the optional front bezel, if applicable. See "Replacing the Bezel."

Memory

 The four memory module sockets on the system board can accommodate from 256 MB to 8 GB of registered DDR SDRAM. See Figure 4-6.

Memory Module Upgrade Kits

 The system is upgradable to 8 GB by installing combinations of 128-, 256-, 512-MB, 1-GB, or 2-GB registered memory modules. You can purchase memory upgrade kits as needed.

Memory Module Installation Guidelines

 Starting with the socket closest to the edge of the system board, the memory module sockets are labeled DIMM_1A and DIMM_1B (bank 1) and DIMM_2A and DIMM_2B (bank 2). See Figure 4-6. When you install memory modules, follow these guidelines:

l  You must install memory modules in matched pairs (bank 1 DIMMs must match; bank 2 DIMMs must match).

l  Install a pair of memory modules in bank 1 before installing a second pair in bank 2.

Figure 4-6.  Memory Module Sockets 

 Table 4-1 illustrates several sample memory configurations based on these guidelines.

Table 4-1.  Sample Memory Configurations 

NOTE: Installing a filler bracket over an empty expansion slot is necessary to maintain Federal Communications Commission (FCC) certification of the system. The brackets also keep dust and dirt out of the system and aid in proper cooling and airflow inside the system.

NOTE: The memory modules must be rated for 266-MHz operation.

  BANK1 BANK2

Total Desired Memory DIMM_1A DIMM_1B DIMM_2A DIMM_2B

256 MB 128 MB 128 MB none none

512 MB 256 MB 256 MB none none

1 GB 256 MB 256 MB 256 MB 256 MB

4 GB 1 GB 1 GB 1 GB 1 GB

8 GB 2 GB 2 GB 2 GB 2 GB

Performing a Memory Module Upgrade

 To perform a memory module upgrade to the system board, perform the following steps.

1.  Remove the optional front bezel, if present. See "Removing the Bezel."

2.  Turn off the system, including any attached peripherals, and disconnect the system from its electrical outlet.

3.  Open the system covers. See "Opening the System Covers."

4.  Locate the memory module sockets in which you will install or replace memory modules.

 Figure 4-6 identifies the memory module banks on the system board and shows the order of the socket designations.

5.  Install or replace the memory modules as necessary to reach the desired memory total. See "Installing Memory Modules" or "Removing Memory Modules."

6.  Close the system covers. See "Closing the System Covers."

7.  Reconnect the system to the electrical outlet, and turn on the system.

 After the system completes the POST routine, it runs a memory test. The system detects that the new memory does not match the system configuration information and displays an error message.

8.  Press to enter the System Setup program, and check the System Memory setting on the System Setup screens.

 The system should have already changed the value in the System Memory setting to reflect the newly installed memory.

9.  If the System Memory value is incorrect, one or more of the memory modules may not be installed properly. Repeat step 2 through step 7, ensuring that the memory modules are firmly seated in their sockets.

10.  Run the system memory test in the system diagnostics.

11.  Replace the optional front bezel, if applicable. See "Replacing the Bezel."

Installing Memory Modules

 To install a memory module, perform the following steps:

1.  To open the memory module socket, press down and outward on the socket latches. See Figure 4-7.

Figure 4-7.  Installing a Memory Module 

2.  Align the memory module's edge connector with the slot in the center of the memory module socket, and insert the memory module straight down into the socket. See Figure 4-7.

 The module and the socket are keyed to prevent misalignment.

3.  Press down on the memory module with your thumbs until the latches snap up around the module, securing it. See Figure 4-7.

 When the memory module is properly seated in the socket, the latches on the memory module socket should align with the latches on the other sockets with memory modules installed.

Removing Memory Modules

 To remove a memory module, press down and outward on the socket latches on each end of the socket until the memory module pops out of the socket. See Figure 4-8.

CAUTION: Only trained service technicians are authorized to open the system covers and access any of the components inside the system. See the System Information Guide for complete information about safety precautions, working inside the system, and protecting against electrostatic discharge.

Figure 4-8.  Removing Memory Modules 

Microprocessors

 Your system contains up to two Intel Xeon 400- or 533-MHz front-side bus microprocessors. The 400-MHz front-side bus processors provide a minimum internal operating frequency of at least 2.0 GHz, with a front-side bus speed of 100 MHz, an address bus speed of 200 MHz (doubled address transfer rate), and a data bus speed of 400 MHz (quadrupled data transfer rate).

 The system's DDR SDRAM memory modules, which are rated for 266-MHz operation, run at 200 MHz in a system using a 400-MHz front-side bus processor.

 To take advantage of future options in speed and functionality, you can add a second microprocessor or replace either the primary or secondary microprocessor.

 Each microprocessor and its associated level 2 (L2) cache memory are contained in an FC-PGA2 package that is installed in a ZIF socket on the system board. The secondary microprocessor must have the same operating frequency and cache size as the primary microprocessor.

 The following items are included in the microprocessor upgrade kit:

l  A microprocessor

l  A heat sink

l  Two retention clips

 The following subsections describes how to remove and install a microprocessor in either the primary or secondary microprocessor connector.

Removing a Microprocessor

1.  Remove the optional front bezel, if present. See "Removing the Bezel."

2.  Turn off the system, including any attached peripherals, and disconnect the system from its electrical outlet.

3.  Open the system covers. See "Opening the System Covers."

4.  To remove the two retention clips that secure the heat sink to the microprocessor socket at both ends, press down firmly on the release tab of each retention clip until it disengages from the socket. See Figure 4-9.

NOTICE: The second microprocessor must be of the same type and speed as the first microprocessor.

CAUTION: Ensure that you install only microprocessors purchased from Dell and intended for this system. Using a different microprocessor could cause data loss, system damage, or personal injury.

NOTE: When installing a new microprocessor, always use the new heat sink that is shipped with the microprocessor upgrade kit. Thermal interface grease on the underside of the heat sink is critical to maintaining optimum contact between the heat sink and the microprocessor. Used or older heat sinks may not have enough grease remaining on them to ensure proper contact.

CAUTION: Only trained service technicians are authorized to open the system covers and access any of the components inside the system. See the System Information Guide for complete information about safety precautions, working inside the system, and protecting against electrostatic discharge.

NOTICE: Never remove the heat sink from a microprocessor unless you intend to remove the microprocessor. The heat sink is necessary to maintain proper thermal conditions.

CAUTION: The microprocessor chip and heat sink can become extremely hot. Be sure that the microprocessor has had sufficient time to cool before handling.

Figure 4-9.  Retention Clip 

5.  Remove the heat sink.

6.  Remove the microprocessor from the socket by pulling the socket release lever straight up until the processor is released, and then lift the processor out of the socket. See Figure 4-10.

 If you are installing a new microprocessor, leave the release lever up so that the socket is ready for the new microprocessor.

Figure 4-10.  Removing the Microprocessor 

Installing a Microprocessor

1.  Remove the optional front bezel, if present. See "Removing the Bezel."

2.  Turn off the system, including any attached peripherals, and disconnect the system from its electrical outlet.

3.  Open the system covers. See "Opening the System Covers."

4.  Some systems have a plastic heat-sink filler plate installed over an unused microprocessor socket. If you are installing a second microprocessor and the plate is present, remove the plate by pressing in the two top tabs and lifting the plate away.

5.  Unpack the new microprocessor.

6.  Identify the pin-1 corner of the microprocessor, indicated by a tiny gold triangle on the top of the microprocessor. See Figure 4-11.

Figure 4-11.  Pin-1 Identification

NOTICE: Be careful not to bend any of the pins when removing the microprocessor. Bending the pins can permanently damage the microprocessor.

CAUTION: Only trained service technicians are authorized to open the system covers and access any of the components inside the system. See the System Information Guide for complete information about safety precautions, working inside the system, and protecting against electrostatic discharge.

NOTICE: Be careful not to bend any of the pins when unpacking the microprocessor. Bending the pins can permanently damage the microprocessor.

NOTICE: Identifying the pin-1 corners is critical to positioning the processor correctly.

7.  Align the pin-1 corner of the microprocessor with the pin-1 corner of the microprocessor socket, which is also identified by a small triangle. See Figure 4- 12.

Figure 4-12.  Installing the Microprocessor 

8.  Install the microprocessor in the socket. See Figure 4-12.

a.  If the release lever on the microprocessor socket is not all the way up, move it to that position now. See Figure 4-12.

b.  With the pin-1 corners of the processor and socket aligned, set the processor lightly in the socket and make sure that all pins are matched with the correct holes in the socket.

 Because the system uses a ZIF microprocessor socket, you do not need to use force (which could bend the pins if the microprocessor is misaligned). When the microprocessor is positioned correctly, it should drop down into the socket with minimal pressure.

c.  When the processor is fully seated in the socket, rotate the socket release lever back down until it snaps into place, securing the processor.

9.  Peel away and discard the thin plastic cover that protects the thermal grease on the new heat sink.

10.  Place the heat sink on top of the microprocessor, grease side down. See Figure 4-13.

11.  Replace the two retention clips:

a.  Orient the retention clips. When installed, the clips face opposite directions:

l  For processor 1, the outer retention clip's release tab faces the back of the system; the inner retention clip faces the opposite direction.

l  For processor 2, the outer retention clip's release tab faces the front of the system; the inner retention clip faces the opposite direction.

b.  Hook the end of the clip that is opposite the release tab over the retaining tab on the edge of the socket.

c.  Press the clip down so that the hole in the middle of the clip engages the tab in the side of the socket.

d.  Continue pressing down on the release tab (you may need to also press in on the free end of the clip) until the end of the clip snaps over the tab on the corner of the socket. See Figure 4-13.

Figure 4-13.  Installing the Heat Sink 

NOTICE: Positioning the microprocessor incorrectly can permanently damage the processor and the system when you turn on the system.

NOTICE: When placing the microprocessor in the socket, be sure that all of the pins on the processor go into the corresponding holes of the socket. Be careful not to bend the pins.

NOTE: To ensure that the proper amount of thermal interface grease is present, use the new heat sink included in the microprocessor upgrade kit.

12.  Close the system covers. See "Closing the System Covers."

13.  Reconnect your system and peripherals to their electrical outlets, and turn them on.

 As the system boots, it detects the presence of the new microprocessor and automatically changes the system configuration information in the System Setup program.

14.  Press to enter the System Setup program, and check that the microprocessor categories match the new system configuration. See "Using the System Setup Program" for instructions.

15.  Run the system diagnostics to verify that the new microprocessor is operating correctly.

 See "Running the System Diagnostics" for information on running the diagnostics and troubleshooting any problems that may occur.

16.  Replace the optional front bezel, if applicable. See "Replacing the Bezel."

ROMB Card

Removing a ROMB Card

1.  Remove the optional front bezel, if present. See "Removing the Bezel."

2.  Turn off the system, including any attached peripherals, and disconnect the system from the electrical outlet.

3.  Open the system covers. See "Opening the System Covers."

4.  If a PCI card is installed over the ROMB card, remove the PCI card. See "Removing an Expansion Card."

5.  Press the four standoff latches outward and pull the ROMB card up out of the standoffs. See Figure 4-14.

6.  If a RAC (ERA/O card) is installed beneath the ROMB backup battery, you must remove the SCSI backplane board before removing the battery. If backplane board removal is necessary, see "Removing the SCSI Backplane Board."

CAUTION: Only trained service technicians are authorized to remove the system cover and access any of the components inside the system. See your System Information Guide for complete information about safety precautions, working inside the system, and protecting against electrostatic discharge.

NOTICE: To avoid possible data loss, back up all data on the hard drives before changing the mode of operation of the integrated SCSI controller from SCSI to RAID.

CAUTION: Only trained service technicians are authorized to remove the system cover and access any of the components inside the system. See your System Information Guide for complete information about safety precautions, working inside the system, and protecting against electrostatic discharge.

NOTICE: To avoid possible data loss, back up all data on the hard drives before changing the mode of operation of the integrated SCSI controller from SCSI to RAID.

7.  Remove the ROMB backup battery. See Figure 4-14.

a.  Disconnect the ROMB backup battery from the backup battery connector (RAID BAT).

b.  While pressing the two standoff latches outward, pull the battery assembly up and out of the standoffs.

8.  If you removed the SCSI backplane board in step 6, reinstall it now. See "Installing the SCSI Backplane Board."

9.  Close the system covers. See "Closing the System Covers."

10.  Reconnect the system and peripherals to their power sources, and turn them on. 

11.  Replace the optional front bezel, if applicable. See "Replacing the Bezel."

Figure 4-14.  ROMB Card and Backup Battery 

Installing a ROMB Card

1.  Remove the optional front bezel, if present. See "Removing the Bezel."

2.  Turn off the system, including any attached peripherals, and disconnect the system from the electrical outlet.

3.  Open the system covers. See "Opening the System Covers."

4.  Locate the ROMB card connector on the system board. See Figure 4-14.

5.  If a PCI card is installed over the ROMB card connector, remove it. See "Removing an Expansion Card."

6.  If you are replacing an existing ROMB card, remove the card. See "Removing a ROMB Card."

7.  Position the new ROMB card with the notch in its plastic cover facing the redundant power supply bay, and align the edges of the card with the four plastic standoffs on the system board.

8.  Press down on the three "bulls eyes" on the ROMB card cover until the four plastic standoffs latches snap over the edge of the card. See Figure 4-14.

9.  If a RAC (ERA/O card) is installed on the system board, you must remove the SCSI backplane board to install the ROMB backup battery. If backplane board removal is necessary, see "Removing the SCSI Backplane Board."

10.  Install the ROMB backup battery:

a.  Position the battery board as shown in Figure 4-14, and press it down into the two standoffs until the latches snap into place.

b.  Plug the battery cable into the RAID BAT connector on the system board.

11.  If you removed the SCSI backplane board in step 9, reinstall it now. See "Installing the SCSI Backplane Board."

12.  If you removed a PCI card in step 5, replace it. See "Installing an Expansion Card."

13.  Close the system covers. See "Closing the System Covers."

14.  Reconnect the system and peripherals to their power sources, and turn them on. 

15.  Enter the System Setup program and verify that the setting for the SCSI controller has changed to reflect the presence of the RAID hardware. See "Using the System Setup Program."

16.  Replace the optional front bezel, if applicable. See "Replacing the Bezel."

17.  Install the RAID software. See the ROMB card software documentation for more information.

Cooling Fans

 The five system-board cooling fans and two power-supply cooling fans must be installed and operational at all times. See Figure 4-15. A blinking amber LED next to a fan power connector indicates a faulty fan that needs to be replaced.

Removing a Fan

1.  Remove the optional front bezel, if present. See "Removing the Bezel."

2.  Open the system covers. See "Opening the System Covers."

3.  Locate the faulty cooling fan(s) with the blinking amber LEDs.

4.  Before replacing a fan, check the fan's power cable connection to verify that a loose connection is not the problem. If the problem is not resolved, continue with this procedure.

Figure 4-15.  Cooling Fan 

5.  Disconnect the fan power cable from the system board or control panel board.

6.  Lift the defective fan straight up out of the power-supply bay or fan bracket. See Figure 4-15.

Installing a Fan

1.  Remove the failed fan. See "Removing a Fan."

2.  Insert the new fan straight down into the power-supply bay or fan bracket. The fans are keyed for correct orientation and cannot be installed backwards:

l  For fans installed in the fan bracket, the finger guard on the fan faces the front of the system.

l  For the two fans installed in the power-supply bays, some systems have fans with the finger guards facing the rear of the system and others have fans with the finger guards facing the front of the system. Install the new fan according to its keyed orientation.

3.  Connect the fan power cable to the associated power connector on the system board or control panel board.

4.  Close the system covers. See "Closing the System Covers."

5.  Replace the optional front bezel, if applicable. See "Replacing the Bezel."

Cooling Fan Bracket

CAUTION: Only trained service technicians are authorized to remove the system cover and access any of the components inside the system. See your System Information Guide for complete information about safety precautions, working inside the system, and protecting against electrostatic discharge.

NOTICE: The fans are hot-pluggable. If a fan fails, replace it as soon as possible. Operating the system with a failed fan may cause the system to overheat and lock up.

NOTE: After installing a new fan, allow up to 30 seconds for the system to recognize the fan and determine whether it is working properly. If the replacement fan does not operate, the control panel, control panel cable, or system board is faulty.

CAUTION: Only trained service technicians are authorized to remove the system cover and access any of the components inside the system. See your System Information Guide for complete information about safety precautions, working inside the system, and protecting against electrostatic discharge.

Removing the Fan Bracket

1.  Remove the optional front bezel, if present. See "Removing the Bezel."

2.  Turn off the system, including any attached peripherals, and disconnect the system from the electrical outlet.

3.  Open the system covers. See "Opening the System Covers."

4.  Locate the fan bracket. See Figure 4-16.

Figure 4-16.  Fan Bracket 

5.  Remove the fan bracket with the fans intact:

a.  For each fan mounted in the bracket, disconnect the fan power cable from the system board.

b.  Press the fan bracket release tabs (one at each end of the bracket) and lift the fan bracket out of the system.

c.  Place the fan bracket on a smooth surface and lift each fan straight up out of the bracket.

Installing the Fan Bracket

1.  Remove the old fan bracket. See "Removing the Fan Bracket."

2.  Insert the fans straight down into the new bracket. Orient the fans so that the finger guards will face the front of the system when the bracket is installed.

3.  Lower the fan bracket into the chassis until the two release latches click into place. See Figure 4-16.

4.  Connect the fan power cables to their connectors on the system board.

5.  Close the system covers. See "Closing the System Covers."

6.  Reconnect the system and peripherals to their power sources, and turn them on. 

7.  Replace the optional front bezel, if applicable. See "Replacing the Bezel."

Control Panel

Removing the Control Panel

1.  Remove the optional front bezel, if present. See "Removing the Bezel."

2.  Turn off the system, including any attached peripherals, and disconnect the system from its electrical outlet.

3.  Open the system covers. See "Opening the System Covers."

4.  Locate the control panel. See Figure 4-17.

Figure 4-17.  Control Panel 

CAUTION: Only trained service technicians are authorized to open the system covers and access any of the components inside the system. See the System Information Guide for complete information about safety precautions, working inside the system, and protecting against electrostatic discharge.

5.  Remove the cooling fan that is located behind the control panel. See "Removing a Fan."

 The fan power cable attaches to the control panel flex cable assembly.

6.  Loosen the thumbscrew that secures the flex cable assembly to the control panel board (PLANAR), and lift the flex cable assembly up out of its connector. See Figure 4-17.

7.  Remove the hex-head Phillips screw that secures the control panel board to the chassis. See Figure 4-17.

8.  Slide the control panel board back and lift it from the system.

Installing a Control Panel

1.  Insert the control panel board into the chassis and slide it forward into place.

2.  Insert and tighten the hex-head Phillips screw that secures the control panel board to the chassis.

3.  Insert the flex-cable assembly into its connector on the control panel board and tighten the thumbscrew.

4.  Replace the cooling fan and connect the fan power cable to the power connector on the flex-cable assembly.

5.  Close the system covers. See "Closing the System Covers."

6.  Reconnect the system and peripherals to their power sources, and turn them on. 

7.  Replace the optional front bezel, if applicable. See "Replacing the Bezel."

Removing and Replacing Power Supplies

Removing a Power Supply

1.  Remove the optional front bezel, if present. See "Removing the Bezel."

2.  Open the system covers. See "Opening the System Covers."

3.  Identify the failed supply using the red fault indicator on the top of the supply. See Figure 3-5.

4.  Disconnect the AC cord for the power supply. To identify the correct power connector, see Figure 3-4.

5.  Grasp the power supply handle and slide the power supply away from the power distribution board approximately 0.75 inch (2 cm), and then lift the power supply out of the chassis. See Figure 4-18.

Figure 4-18.  Removing a Power Supply 

CAUTION: Only trained service technicians are authorized to remove the system cover and access any of the components inside the system. See your System Information Guide for complete information about safety precautions, working inside the system, and protecting against electrostatic discharge.

CAUTION: The connectors on the PDB contain high voltage. Do not remove the metal cover from the PDB or touch the connectors on the PDB or power supply.

NOTE: The power supplies are hot-pluggable. Remove and replace only one power supply at a time.

CAUTION: Disconnect the AC cord for the failed power supply before removing the power supply.

Installing a Power Supply

1.  To install the replacement power supply, align the stud on the side of the power supply with the corresponding notch in the chassis wall, and then lower the power supply into the chassis. See Figure 4-18.

2.  Slide the power supply toward the PDB until the power supply connector is fully seated in the PDB connector.

3.  Close the system covers. See "Closing the System Covers."

4.  Replace the optional front bezel, if applicable. See "Replacing the Bezel."

Power Distribution Board

Removing the Power Distribution Board

1.  Remove the optional front bezel, if present. See "Removing the Bezel."

2.  Turn off the system, including any attached peripherals, and disconnect the system from the electrical outlet.

3.  Open the system covers. See "Opening the System Covers."

4.  Remove the power supplies. See "Removing a Power Supply."

5.  Remove the screw that secures the cover to the PDB, and lift out the cover. See Figure 4-19.

Figure 4-19.  Power Distribution Board 

NOTE: If the cover does not close completely over the power supplie(s), one or both power supplies are not properly installed. Remove the power supplie(s) and repeat steps 1 and 2 until the cover closes properly.

CAUTION: Only trained service technicians are authorized to remove the system cover and access any of the components inside the system. See your System Information Guide for complete information about safety precautions, working inside the system, and protecting against electrostatic discharge.

CAUTION: Avoid touching the cable connectors on the power supplies. Wait 10 to 20 seconds after disconnecting the power cables before removing the power supplies or coming into contact with their cable connectors.

6.  Disconnect the output power cable from the PS_PWR connector on the system board.

7.  Disconnect the power signal cable from the PS_SIG connector on the system board.

8.  Disconnect both of the input power cables from the top of the PDB.

9.  Lift the PDB out of the chassis.

Installing a Power Distribution Board

1.  Route the PDB's output power cable and power signal cable through the cutout in the side of the power-supply enclosure, and lower the PDB into the chassis.

2.  Connect both input power cables to the top of the PDB.

3.  Connect the power signal cable to the PS_SIG connector on the system board.

4.  Connect the output power cable to the PS_PWR connector on the system board.

5.  Place the cover over the PDB and replace the screw.

6.  Reinstall the power supplies. See "Installing a Power Supply."

7.  Close the system covers. See "Closing the System Covers."

8.  Reconnect the system and peripherals to their power sources, and turn them on. 

9.  Replace the optional front bezel, if applicable. See "Replacing the Bezel."

System Battery

 The system battery is a 3.0-V, coin-cell battery located on the system board beside the front power supply.

Removing the System Battery

1.  Enter the System Setup program and, if possible, make a printed copy of the System Setup screens. See "Using the System Setup Program."

2.  Remove the optional front bezel, if present. See "Removing the Bezel."

3.  Turn off the system, including any attached peripherals, and disconnect the system from the electrical outlet.

4.  Open the system covers. See "Opening the System Covers."

5.  Remove the system battery. See Figure 5-3 for the battery connector location.

a.  Support the battery connector by pressing down firmly on the positive side of the connector. See Figure 4-20.

b.  While supporting the battery connector, press the battery toward the positive side of the connector and pry it up out of the securing tabs at the negative side of the connector.

Figure 4-20.  System Battery 

CAUTION: Only trained service technicians are authorized to remove the system cover and access any of the components inside the system. See your System Information Guide for complete information about safety precautions, working inside the system, and protecting against electrostatic discharge.

CAUTION: There is a danger of a new battery exploding if it is incorrectly installed. Replace the battery only with the same or equivalent type recommended by the manufacturer. Discard used batteries according to the manufacturer's instructions.

NOTICE: To avoid damage to the battery connector, you must firmly support the connector while installing or removing a battery.

Installing the System Battery

1.  Install the new system battery. See Figure 4-20.

a.  Support the battery connector by pressing down firmly on the positive side of the connector.

b.  Hold the battery with the "+" facing up, and slide it under the securing tabs at the positive side of the connector.

c.  Press the battery straight down into the connector until it snaps into place.

2.  Close the system covers. See "Closing the System Covers."

3.  Reconnect the system and any attached peripherals to their electrical outlets, and turn them on.

4.  Replace the optional front bezel, if applicable. See "Replacing the Bezel."

5.  Enter the System Setup program to confirm that the battery is operating properly. See "Using the System Setup Program."

6.  Enter the correct time and date in the System Setup program's Time and Date settings.

7.  Re-enter any system configuration information that is no longer displayed on the System Setup screens, and then exit the System Setup program.

8.  To test the newly installed battery, power down and disconnect the system from its electrical source for at least an hour.

9.  After an hour, connect the system to its electrical source and turn on the power.

10.  Enter the System Setup program and if the time and date are still incorrect, replace the system board.

SCSI Backplane Board

 The bottom of the SCSI backplane board provides three connectors for connecting up to three SCSI hard drives to the system board SCSI controller. Connectors for the CD drive and diskette drive are on the top of the backplane.

Removing the SCSI Backplane Board

1.  Remove the optional front bezel, if present. See "Removing the Bezel."

2.  Turn off the system, including any attached peripherals, and disconnect the system from the electrical outlet.

3.  Open the system covers. See "Opening the System Covers."

4.  Pull each hard-drive carrier partially out of its slot, approximately 2.5 cm (1 inch).

Figure 4-21.  SCSI Backplane Board 

NOTICE: To avoid damage to the battery connector, you must firmly support the connector while installing or removing a battery.

CAUTION: Only trained service technicians are authorized to remove the system cover and access any of the components inside the system. See your System Information Guide for complete information about safety precautions, working inside the system, and protecting against electrostatic discharge.

5.  Disconnect the diskette-drive interface cable from the FLOPPY connector on the backplane board. See Figure 4-21.

6.  Disconnect the CD drive interface cable from the CD_ROM connector on the backplane board. See Figure 4-21.

7.  Press the release latch in toward the backplane board and use the handle to pull the board out of its connector and up out of the chassis.

Installing the SCSI Backplane Board

1.  Insert the SCSI backplane board into the chassis:

a.  Fit the metal tabs (one tab at each end of the backplane) into the slots in the chassis wall and lower the backplane into the chassis, ensuring that the CD and diskette drive interface cables are not caught under the backplane.

b.  Press down firmly over the handle to seat the backplane in its connector.

2.  Pivot the release latch out into the securing slot in the chassis.

3.  Connect the CD drive interface cable to the CD_ROM connector on the backplane board. See Figure 5-4.

4.  Connect the diskette-drive interface cable to the FLOPPY connector on the backplane board. See Figure 5-4.

5.  Press all installed hard drives firmly back into the SCSI connectors on the backplane.

6.  Close the system covers. See "Closing the System Covers."

7.  Reconnect the system and any attached peripherals to their electrical outlets, and turn them on.

8.  Replace the optional front bezel, if applicable. See "Replacing the Bezel."

System Board

Removing the System Board

1.  Remove the optional front bezel, if present. See "Removing the Bezel."

2.  Turn off the system, including any attached peripherals, and disconnect the system from the electrical outlet.

3.  Open the system covers. See "Opening the System Covers."

4.  Remove the SCSI backplane board. See "Removing the SCSI Backplane Board."

5.  Disconnect all cables attached to the system board. See Figure 5-3.

l  Power and signal cables coming from the PDB (disconnect from the PS_PWR and PS_SIG connectors on the system board)

l  Control panel cable (disconnect from the FRONT_PANEL connector on the system board)

l  System and power-supply fan cables (6)

l  Any other cables attached to the system board, after recording their locations

6.  Remove the fan bracket. See "Removing the Fan Bracket." (Do not remove the fans from the bracket.)

CAUTION: Only trained service technicians are authorized to remove the system cover and access any of the components inside the system. See your System Information Guide for complete information about safety precautions, working inside the system, and protecting against electrostatic discharge.

7.  Remove all external peripheral cables from their connectors at the back of the system.

8.  Remove any installed PCI expansion cards. See "Removing an Expansion Card."

9.  Remove the PCI riser board assembly by pulling it straight up out of its connectors.

10.  Remove the optional ROMB card and its backup battery, if they are installed. See "Removing a ROMB Card."

11.  Remove the optional RAC, if one is installed. See Figure 5-3 for the location of the RAC connector ("EMBEDDED_REMOTE_ASSISTANT").

12.  Remove the memory modules. See "Removing Memory Modules."

13.  Remove the microprocessor and heat sink assemblies. See "Removing a Microprocessor."

14.  Loosen the thumbscrew securing the system board to the chassis. See Figure 4-22.

Figure 4-22.  System Board 

15.  Slide the system board toward the front of the chassis about 6.3 mm (0.25 inch).

16.  Carefully lift the system board up and out of the chassis. Lift the board evenly, without twisting it. Take care not to catch or scrape the cables from the control panel, the PDB, and the rear fan.

Installing the System Board

1.  Lower the system board into the chassis, left side first to protect the PDB, control panel, and rear fan cables. Press the system board evenly onto all the grounding tabs on the floor of the chassis.

2.  Slide the system board toward the back of the chassis as far as it will go, about 6.3 mm (0.25 inch).

3.  Tighten the thumbscrew to secure the system board.

4.  Check to ensure that the system board jumpers are set to the same settings as the board you removed.

5.  Install the microprocessor and heat-sink assemblies. See "Installing a Microprocessor."

6.  Install the memory modules. See "Installing Memory Modules."

7.  Install the optional RAC, if it was installed on the board you removed. See Figure 5-3 for the location of the RAC connector; see the RAC documentation for more information.

8.  Install the optional ROMB card and its backup battery, if they were installed on the board you removed. See "Installing a ROMB Card."

9.  Press the PCI riser board assembly firmly into its connectors.

10.  Install the PCI expansion cards. See "Installing an Expansion Card."

11.  Install the fan bracket assembly and connect the fans in the bracket to the system board. See "Installing the Fan Bracket."

12.  Connect the remaining cables to the system board:

l  Power cable from rear fan to the FAN7 connector

l  Power signal cable from the PDB to the PS_SIG connector

l  Output power cable from the PDB to the PS_PWR connector

l  Control panel cable to the FRONT_PANEL connector

l  Any other cables you removed from the original board

13.  Install the SCSI backplane board and any drives you removed or disconnected. See "Installing the SCSI Backplane Board."

14.  Connect the external peripheral cables to their connectors at the back of the system.

15.  Carefully check for any cables or components not installed or improperly seated in their connectors on the system board.

16.  Close the system covers. See "Closing the System Covers."

17.  Connect the power cable to the system and turn the system on.

18.  Replace the optional front bezel, if applicable. See "Replacing the Bezel."

Internal SCSI Hard Drives

 The three internal hard-drive bays accommodate up to three 1-inch SCSI hard drives that connect directly to the SCSI backplane board. No drive cables are necessary.

Before You Begin

 SCSI hard drives are supplied in special drive carriers that fit in the hard-drive bays.

 You may need to use different programs than those provided with the operating system to partition and format SCSI hard drives.

 When you format a high-capacity SCSI hard drive, allow enough time for the formatting to be completed. Long format times for these drives are normal. A 9- GB hard drive, for example, can take up to 2.5 hours to format.

Installing a SCSI Hard Drive

1.  If the system does not have a ROMB card installed, shut down the system.

2.  Remove the optional front bezel, if attached. See "Removing the Bezel."

3.  Open the hard-drive handle and remove the drive blank (or the hard drive you intend to replace). See Figure 4-23.

Figure 4-23.  Installing a SCSI Hard Drive 

4.  Insert the new hard drive into the drive bay. See Figure 4-23.

5.  Close the hard-drive handle to lock the drive in place.

6.  Replace the optional front bezel, if one was attached. See "Replacing the Bezel."

7.  If the hard drive is a new drive, run the SCSI Controllers test in the system diagnostics. See "Running the System Diagnostics."

Removing a SCSI Hard Drive

1.  If the system does not have a ROMB installed, shut down the system.

2.  Remove the optional front bezel, if attached. See "Removing the Bezel."

3.  For systems with a ROMB card, power down the hard-drive bay and wait until the SCSI hard-drive indicators on the drive carrier signal that the drive can be removed safely.

NOTICE: Before attempting to remove or install a drive while the system is running, see the documentation for the host adapter to ensure that the host adapter is configured correctly to support hot-pluggable drive removal and insertion.

NOTE: It is recommended that you use only drives that have been tested and approved for use with the SCSI backplane board.

NOTICE: Do not turn off or reboot your system while the drive is being formatted. Doing so can cause a drive failure.

NOTICE: Hot-plug drive installation is not supported for systems without the optional ROMB card.

NOTICE: Hot-plug drive installation is not supported for systems without the optional ROMB card.

 If the drive has been online, the green power on/fault indicator will flash as the drive is powered down. When both drive indicators are off, the drive is ready for removal.

4.  Open the hard-drive handle to release the drive.

5.  Slide the hard drive out until it is free of the drive bay.

6.  Replace the optional front bezel, if one was attached. See "Replacing the Bezel."

External SCSI Hard Drives

 Follow these general guidelines when connecting external SCSI hard drives to the external SCSI connector on the system's back panel or to a SCSI controller card.

1.  Remove the optional front bezel, if present. See "Removing the Bezel."

2.  Turn off the system, including any attached peripherals, and disconnect the system from the electrical outlet.

3.  Open the system covers. See "Opening the System Covers."

4.  If you are installing a SCSI controller card, install the card now. See "Installing an Expansion Card."

5.  Connect the external SCSI devices to the external SCSI connector on the system's back panel or to the SCSI controller card.

 If you are attaching multiple external SCSI devices, daisy-chain the devices using the cables shipped with each device.

6.  Close the system covers. See "Closing the System Covers."

7.  Reconnect the system to an electrical outlet and turn it on.

8.  Replace the optional front bezel, if applicable. See "Replacing the Bezel."

9.  Connect the external device(s) to electrical outlet(s) and turn them on.

10.  Install any required SCSI device drivers. See "Installing and Configuring SCSI Drivers" in the User's Guide.

11.  Test the SCSI devices. See "Running the System Diagnostics."

Configuring the Boot Device

 If you plan to boot the system from a hard drive, the drive must be attached to the primary (or boot) controller. The device that the system boots from is determined by the boot order specified in the System Setup program. See "Using the System Setup Program."

Installing an External SCSI Tape Drive

 This section describes how to configure and install an external SCSI tape drive with an add-in PCI controller card.

1.  Remove the optional front bezel, if present. See "Removing the Bezel."

2.  Turn off the system, including any attached peripherals, and disconnect the system from the electrical outlet.

3.  Open the system covers. See "Opening the System Covers."

4.  Ground yourself by touching an unpainted metal surface on the back of the system, unpack the drive and controller card, and configure the tape drive according to the tape drive documentation, based on the following guidelines:

a.  Each device attached to a SCSI host adapter must have a unique SCSI ID number. (Narrow SCSI devices use IDs 0 to 7; wide SCSI devices use IDs from 0 to 15).

 A SCSI tape drive is typically configured as SCSI ID 6.

b.  SCSI logic requires that the two devices at opposite ends of a SCSI chain be terminated and that all devices in between be unterminated. Therefore, you enable the tape drive's termination if it is the last device in a chain of devices (or sole device) connected to the SCSI controller.

CAUTION: Only trained service technicians are authorized to remove the system cover and access any of the components inside the system. See your System Information Guide for complete information about safety precautions, working inside the system, and protecting against electrostatic discharge.

NOTE: The integrated SCSI controller does not support mixed mode (one channel SCSI and one channel RAID). For this reason, in a system with RAID, Dell does not support an external tape drive connected to the external SCSI controller.

CAUTION: Only trained service technicians are authorized to remove the system cover and access any of the components inside the system. See your System Information Guide for complete information about safety precautions, working inside the system, and protecting against electrostatic discharge.

NOTE: There is no requirement that SCSI ID numbers be assigned sequentially or that devices be attached to the cable in order by ID number.

5.  Install the controller card in an expansion slot. See "Installing an Expansion Card."

6.  Connect the tape drive's interface/output power cable to the connector on the controller card supplied with the tape drive.

7.  Close the system covers. See "Closing the System Covers."

8.  Reconnect the system and peripherals to their electrical outlets, and turn them on.

9.  Replace the optional front bezel, if applicable. See "Replacing the Bezel."

10.  Perform a tape backup and verification test with the drive as instructed in the software documentation that came with the drive.

Installing a Diskette Drive

 The optional diskette drive is installed in a carrier that slides into the peripheral bay. Perform the following steps to install a diskette drive.

1.  Remove the optional front bezel, if present. See "Removing the Bezel."

2.  Turn off the system, including any attached peripherals, and disconnect the system from the electrical outlet.

3.  Open the system covers. See "Opening the System Covers."

4.  If a filler plate is installed in the drive bay, remove it now.

5.  If the carrier and the drive were supplied separately, install the drive in the carrier. See Figure 4-24.

Figure 4-24.  Installing a Diskette Drive in a Carrier 

a.  Fit the right edge of the diskette drive into the carrier tray, pressing the drive against the stop tab at the back of the carrier.

b.  Lower the left edge of the drive into the carrier until the drive snaps into place.

c.  Attach the end of the ribbon cable labeled "FLOPPY" to the back of the diskette drive, and then insert the cable through the slot in the cable guide at the back of the carrier.

6.  Slide the drive into the peripheral bay until it is fully seated. See Figure 4-25.

 Ensure that you do not damage the ribbon cable at the back of the drive.

Figure 4-25.  Installing a Diskette Drive 

CAUTION: Only trained service technicians are authorized to remove the system cover and access any of the components inside the system. See your System Information Guide for complete information about safety precautions, working inside the system, and protecting against electrostatic discharge.

7.  Connect the other end of the ribbon cable to the diskette drive connector on the SCSI backplane. See Figure 5-4.

8.  Close the system covers. See "Closing the System Covers."

9.  Reconnect the system and peripherals to their electrical outlets and turn them on.

10.  Replace the optional front bezel, if applicable. See "Replacing the Bezel."

Installing a CD Drive

 The optional CD drive is installed in a carrier that slides into the peripheral bay.

1.  Remove the optional front bezel, if attached. See "Removing the Bezel."

2.  Turn off the system, including any attached peripherals, and disconnect the system from the electrical outlet.

3.  Open the system covers. See "Opening the System Covers."

4.  If a filler plate is installed in the drive bay, remove it now.

5.  If the drive carrier and the drive were supplied separately, install the drive in the carrier. See Figure 4-26.

Figure 4-26.  Installing a CD Drive in a Drive Carrier 

a.  Match the back end of the drive with the back end of the carrier, which has a retention tab.

b.  Fit the right edge of the CD drive into the carrier tray, pressing the drive firmly backward against the stop tab near the right rear corner of the carrier.

c.  Lower the left side of the drive into the carrier until the drive snaps into place.

6.  Slide the drive into the peripheral bay until it is fully inserted. See Figure 4-27.

Figure 4-27.  Installing a CD Drive 

CAUTION: Only trained service technicians are authorized to remove the system cover and access any of the components inside the system. See your System Information Guide for complete information about safety precautions, working inside the system, and protecting against electrostatic discharge.

7.  Connect the CD drive data cable to the CD drive and to the CD drive connector on the SCSI backplane. See Figure 5-4.

8.  Close the system covers. See "Closing the System Covers."

9.  Reconnect the system and peripherals to their electrical outlets and turn them on.

10.  Replace the optional front bezel, if applicable. See "Replacing the Bezel."

Back to Contents Page

Back to Contents Page

Using the System Setup Program Dell PowerEdge 1750 Systems Service Manual

  Entering the System Setup Program

  System Setup Options

  System and Setup Password Features

  Disabling a Forgotten Password

 After you set up your system, run the System Setup program to familiarize yourself with your system configuration and optional settings. Print the System Setup screens by pressing or record the information for future reference.

 You can use the System Setup program to:

l  Change the system configuration stored in NVRAM after you add, change, or remove hardware

l  Set or change user-selectable optionsfor example, the time or date

l  Enable or disable integrated devices

l  Correct discrepancies between the installed hardware and configuration settings

Entering the System Setup Program

1.  Turn on or restart your system.

2.  Press immediately after you see the following message:

= System Setup

 If your operating system begins to load before you press , allow the system to finish booting, and then restart your system and try again.

Responding to Error Messages

 You can enter the System Setup program by responding to certain error messages. If an error message appears while the system is booting, make a note of the message. Before entering the System Setup program, see "System Beep Codes" and "System Messages" for an explanation of the message and suggestions for correcting errors.

Using the System Setup Program

 Table 6-1 lists the keys that you use to view or change information on the System Setup program screens and to exit the program.

Table 6-1. System Setup Program Navigation Keys 

System Setup Options

Main Screen

 When you enter the System Setup program, the main System Setup program screen appears. See Figure 6-1.

Figure 6-1. Main System Setup Program Screen

NOTE: To ensure an orderly system shutdown, see the documentation that accompanied your operating system.

NOTE: After installing a memory upgrade, it is normal for your system to send a message the first time you start your system.

Keys Action

Up arrow or Moves to the previous field.

Down arrow or Moves to the next field.

Spacebar, <+>, <>, left and right arrows Cycles through the settings in a field. In many fields, you can also type the appropriate value.

Exits the System Setup program and restarts the system if any changes were made.

Displays the System Setup program's help file.

NOTE: For most of the options, any changes that you make are recorded but do not take effect until you restart the system.

 Table 6-2 lists the options and descriptions for the information fields that appear on the main System Setup program screen.

Table 6-2. System Setup Program Options 

NOTE: The System Setup program defaults are listed under their respective options, where applicable.

Option Description

System Time Resets the time on the system's internal clock.

System Date Resets the date on the system's internal calendar.

Diskette Drive A: Displays a screen that allows you to select the type of diskette drive for your system.

System Memory Displays the amount of system memory. This option has does not have user-selectable settings.

Video Memory Displays the amount of video memory. This option does not have user-selectable settings.

Redundant Memory Enables or disables the redundant memory feature. When enabled, all memory banks except for the last one are reported back to the operating system. The last bank is reserved for failover conditions. When disabled, all of the available system memory is reported to the operating system.

 NOTE: This feature can be enabled only if all memory banks are populated with memory modules of the same type.

OS Install Mode (Off default)

Determines the maximum amount of memory available to the operating system. On sets the maximum memory to 256 MB. Off makes all of the system memory available to the operating system. Some operating systems cannot install with more than 2 GB of system memory. Enable this option (On) during operating system installation and disable (Off) after installation.

CPU Information (Logical Processor Enabled default)

Displays information related to microprocessors (speed, cache size, and so on). Enable or disable Hyper-Threading technology by changing the setting of the Logical Processor option. Enable or disable memory pre-fetch by changing the setting of the Sequential Memory Access option. Default is Enabled on C1-, D1-, and M0-stepped processors.

Virtual Media (Disabled default)

Enables or disables the virtual media feature (when available). Options are Enabled and Disabled. The default is Disabled until the option becomes available.

Boot Sequence Determines the order in which the system searches for boot devices during system startup. Available options can include the diskette drive, CD drive, hard drives, and network.

Hard-Disk Drive Sequence

Determines the order in which the system searches the hard drives during system startup. The selections depend on the hard drives installed in your system.

Integrated Devices See "Integrated Devices Screen."

PCI IRQ Assignment

Displays a screen to change the IRQ assigned to each of the integrated devices on the PCI bus, and any installed expansion cards that require an IRQ.

PCI Slot Information

Displays a menu of selectable fields. Selecting any of the fields displays the following information for the PCI bus you selected:

l  Occupied or unoccupied l  For occupied slots, the operating frequency and mode of the slots (PCI or PCI-X) l  For unoccupied slots, the maximum operating frequency and the capable operating mode of the slots

Console Redirection

See "Console Redirection Screen."

System Security Displays a screen to configure the system password and setup password features. See "Using the System Password" and "Using the Setup Password" for more information.

Keyboard NumLock Determines whether your system starts up with the NumLock mode activated on 101- or 102-key keyboards (does not apply to 84-key keyboards).

Report Keyboard Errors

Enables or disables reporting of keyboard errors during the POST. Enable this option for host systems that have keyboards attached. Select Do Not Report to suppress all error messages relating to the keyboard or keyboard controller during POST. This setting does not affect the operation of the keyboard itself if a keyboard is attached to the system.

Integrated Devices Screen

 Table 6-3 lists the options and descriptions for the information fields that appear on the Integrated Devices screen.

Table 6-3. Integrated Devices Screen Options 

Console Redirection Screen

 Table 6-4 lists the options and descriptions for the information fields that appear on the Console Redirection screen. For more information about using console redirection, see "Using Console Redirection" in the User's Guide.

Table 6-4. Console Redirection Screen Options 

System Security Screen

 Table 6-5 lists the options and descriptions for the information fields that appear on the System Security screen.

Table 6-5. System Security Screen Options 

Asset Tag Displays the customer-programmable asset tag number for the system if an asset tag number has been assigned.

Option Description

Embedded RAID Controller

Selects between RAID, SCSI, or Off. The configurable options vary, depending on whether the optional ROMB is installed.

l  With the ROMB installed Select either RAID Enabled, SCSI Enabled, or Off. l  Without the ROMB installed Select either SCSI or Off.

IDE Controller Enables the integrated IDE CD controller. When set to Auto, each channel of the integrated IDE controller is enabled if IDE devices are attached to the channel and an external IDE controller is not detected. Otherwise, the channel is disabled.

Diskette Controller (Auto default)

Enables or disables the system's diskette drive controller. When Auto is selected, the system turns off the controller when necessary to accommodate a controller card installed in an expansion slot. You can also configure the drive as read-only. When using the read-only setting, the drive cannot be used to write to a disk.

USB Controller (On with BIOS support default)

Enables or disables the system's USB ports. Options are On with BIOS support, On without BIOS support, or Off. Disabling the USB ports makes system resources available for other devices.

Embedded Gb NIC 1 and NIC 2

Enables or disables the system's integrated NICs. Options are Enabled and Disabled.

NIC 1 PXE Enables or disables the integrated NIC 1 PXE support. Options are Enabled and Disabled. PXE support allows the system to boot from the network. Changes take effect after the system reboots.

NIC 2 PXE Enables or disables the integrated NIC 2 PXE support. Options are Enabled and Disabled. PXE support allows the system to boot from the network. Changes take effect after the system reboots.

MAC Address Displays the MAC address for the integrated Gb NIC. This field does not have user-selectable settings.

Serial Port (Auto default)

Serial port options are COM1, COM3, Auto, and Off.

When the serial port is set to Auto, the integrated port automatically maps to the next available port. The serial port attempts to use COM1 first, and then COM3. If both addresses are in use for a specific port, the port is disabled.

If you set the serial port to Auto and add an expansion card with a port configured to the same designation, the system automatically remaps the integrated port to the next available port designation that shares the same IRQ setting.

If you set the serial port to Off, the system automatically remaps the integrated port to the RAC.

Speaker (On default)

Sets the integrated speaker On or Off. A change to this option takes effect immediately (rebooting the system is not required).

Option Description

Console Redirection (Off default)

Sets the console redirection feature to On or Off.

Remote Terminal Type (VT 100/VT 220 default)

Select either VT 100/VT 220 or ANSI.

Redirection After Boot (Enabled default)

Enables or disables console redirection after your system restarts.

Option Description

System Password

Displays the current status of your system's password security feature and allows you to assign and verify a new system password.

 NOTE: See "Using the System Password" for instructions on assigning a system password and using or changing an existing system password.

Setup Password

Restricts access to the System Setup program in the same way that you restrict access to your system using the system password feature.

 NOTE: See "Using the Setup Password" for instructions on assigning a setup password and using or changing an existing setup password.

Exit Screen

 After you press to exit the System Setup program, the Exit screen displays the following options:

l  Save Changes and Exit

l  Discard Changes and Exit

l  Return to Setup

System and Setup Password Features

 The system is shipped without the system password feature enabled. If system security is a concern, operate the system only with system password protection.

 To change or delete an existing password, you must know the password. See "Deleting or Changing an Existing System Password." If you forget the password, you cannot operate the system or change settings in the System Setup program until a trained service technician changes the password jumper setting to disable the passwords, and erases the existing passwords. See "Disabling a Forgotten Password."

Using the System Password

 After a system password is assigned, only those who know the password have full use of the system. When the System Password option is set to Enabled, the system prompts you for the system password after the system starts.

Assigning a System Password

 Before you assign a system password, enter the System Setup program and check the System Password option.

 When a system password is assigned, the setting shown for the System Password option is Enabled. If the setting shown for the Password Status is Unlocked, you can change the system password. If the Password Status option is Locked, you cannot change the system password. When the system password feature is disabled by a jumper setting, the system password is Disabled, and you cannot change or enter a new system password.

 When a system password is not assigned and the password jumper on the system board is in the enabled (default) position, the setting shown for the System Password option is Not Enabled and the Password Status field is Unlocked. To assign a system password:

1.  Verify that the Password Status option is set to Unlocked.

2.  Highlight the System Password option and press .

3.  Type your new system password.

 You can use up to 32 characters in your password.

 As you press each character key (or the spacebar for a blank space), a placeholder appears in the field.

 The password assignment is not case-sensitive. However, certain key combinations are not valid. If you enter one of these combinations, the system beeps. To erase a character when entering your password, press or the left-arrow key.

Password Status

Setting the Setup Password optionto Enabled prevents the system password from being changed or disabled at system start-up.

To lock the system password, assign a setup password in the Setup Password option and then change the Password Status option to Locked. In this state, you cannot change the system password using the System Password option and cannot be disabled at system start up by pressing .

To unlock the system password, enter the setup password in the Setup Password field and then change the Password Status option to Unlocked. In this state, you can disable the system password at system start up by pressing and then change the password using the System Password option.

Extended Security

When a system password is entered, setting the Extended Security option to Enabled locks all keys on the keyboard during BIOS POST, except for the key. Pressing the key during BIOS POST displays a password prompt that allows 20 seconds for a valid entry before continuing to boot the operating system.

Power Button

Turns system's power off and on.

l  If you turn off the system using the power button and the system is running an ACPI-compliant operating system, the system can perform an orderly shutdown before power is turned off.

l  If the system is not running an ACPI-compliant operating system, power is turned off immediately after the power button is pressed.

The button is enabled in the System Setup program. When disabled, the button can only turn on system power.

NMI Button  NOTICE: Use the NMI button only if directed to do so by qualified support personnel or by the operating system's documentation. Pressing this button halts the operating system and displays a diagnostic screen.

Sets the NMI feature On or Off.

NOTICE: The password features provide a basic level of security for the data on your system. If your data requires more security, use additional forms of protection, such as data encryption programs.

NOTICE: Anyone can access the data stored on your system if you leave the system running and unattended without having a system password assigned or if you leave your system unlocked so that someone can disable the password by changing a jumper setting.

NOTE: To escape from the field without assigning a system password, press to move to another field, or press at any time prior to completing step 5.

4.  Press .

5.  To confirm your password, type it a second time and press .

 The setting shown for the System Password changes to Enabled. Exit the System Setup program and begin using your system.

6.  Either reboot your system now for your password protection to take effect or continue working.

Using Your System Password to Secure Your System

 When the Password Status option is set to Unlocked, you have the option to leave the password security enabled or to disable the password security.

 To leave the password security enabled:

1.  Turn on or reboot your system by pressing .

2.  Press .

3.  Type your password and press .

 To disable the password security:

1.  Turn on or reboot your system by pressing .

2.  Press .

 When the Password Status option is set to Locked wheneveryou turn on your system or reboot your system by pressing , type your password and press at the prompt.

 After you type the correct system password and press , your system operates as usual.

 If an incorrect system password is entered, the system displays a message and prompts you to re-enter your password. You have three attempts to enter the correct password. After the third unsuccessful attempt, the system displays an error message showing the number of unsuccessful attempts and that the system has halted and will shut down. This message can alert you to an unauthorized person attempting to use your system.

 Even after you shut down and restart the system, the error message continues to be displayed until the correct password is entered.

Deleting or Changing an Existing System Password

1.  When prompted, press to disable the existing system password.

 If you are asked to enter your setup password, contact your network administrator.

2.  Enter the System Setup program by pressing during POST.

3.  Select the System Security screen field to verify that the Password Status option is set to Unlocked.

4.  When prompted, type the system password.

5.  Confirm that Not Enabled is displayed for the System Password option.

 If Not Enabled is displayed for the System Password option, the system password has been deleted. If Enabled is displayed for the System Password option, press the key combination to restart the system, and then repeat steps 2 through 5.

Using the Setup Password

Assigning a Setup Password

 You can assign (or change) a setup password only when the Setup Password option is set to Not Enabled. To assign a setup password, highlight the Setup Password option and press the <+> or <> key. The system prompts you to enter and verify the password. If a character is illegal for password use, the system beeps.

 You can use up to 32 characters in your password.

 As you press each character key (or the spacebar for a blank space), a placeholder appears in the field.

 The password assignment is not case-sensitive. However, certain key combinations are not valid. If you enter one of these combinations, the system beeps. To erase a character when entering your password, press or the left-arrow key.

NOTE: Password protection does not take effect until you reboot the system.

NOTE: If you have assigned a setup password (see "Using the Setup Password"), the system accepts your setup password as an alternate system password.

NOTE: You can use the Password Status option in conjunction with the System Password and Setup Password options to further protect your system from unauthorized changes.

NOTE: The setup password can be the same as the system password. If the two passwords are different, the setup password can be used as an alternate system password. However, the system password cannot be used in place of the setup password.

 After you verify the password, the Setup Password setting changes to Enabled. The next time you enter the System Setup program, the system prompts you for the setup password.

 A change to the Setup Password option becomes effective immediately (restarting the system is not required).

Operating With a Setup Password Enabled

 If Setup Password is set to Enabled, you must enter the correct setup password before you can modify most of the System Setup options. When you start the System Setup program, the program prompts you to enter a password.

 If you do not enter the correct password in three attempts, the system lets you view, but not modify, the System Setup screenswith the following exception: If System Password is not set to Enabled and is not locked through the Password Status option, you can assign a system password (however, you cannot disable or change an existing system password).

Deleting or Changing an Existing Setup Password

1.  Enter the System Setup program and select the System Security option.

2.  Highlight the Setup Password option, press to access the setup password window, and press twice to clear the existing setup password.

 The setting changes to Not Enabled.

3.  If you want to assign a new setup password, perform the steps in "Assigning a Setup Password."

Disabling a Forgotten Password

 You can use the password jumper on the system board to enable or disable the password features or clear any password(s) currently in use.

 To disable a forgotten system password or setup password, perform the following steps.

1.  Open the system covers. See "Opening the System Covers."

2.  See Figure 5-2 for the location of the password jumper (labeled "PASSWD") on the system board.

3.  Remove the jumper plug from the PASSWD jumper.

4.  Close the system covers. See "Closing the System Covers."

5.  Reconnect the system to an electrical outlet and turn it on.

 The existing passwords are not disabled (erased) until the system boots with the PASSWD jumper plug removed. However, before you assign a new system and/or setup password, you must reinstall the jumper plug.

6.  Repeat step 1.

7.  Install the jumper plug on the PASSWD jumper.

8.  Close the system covers, and then reconnect the system and peripherals to their electrical outlets and turn them on.

9.  Assign a new system and/or setup password.

 To assign a new passwords using the System Setup program, see "Assigning a System Password" in the User's Guide.

Back to Contents Page

NOTE: You can use the Password Status option in conjunction with the Setup Password o

Manualsnet FAQs

If you want to find out how the PowerEdge Dell works, you can view and download the Dell PowerEdge 1750 Server Service Manual on the Manualsnet website.

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